Diecast Vehicles

Oct19

Important Bridge Part 2

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Zseto Kreuz Die Cast Store & Collezione, Syndicated Blogs

A column of French infantry slogs its way across the hot dusty countryside somewhere in Flanders..Having left you Colonel Pettygrew style, hopefully champing at the bit to find out how the game turned out, I guess you're now wondering what happened...

The Game

First things first - I as the British had to throw for the arrival time of the troops arriving at point D. These were a not insignificant force as they were comprised of some good, solid, British infantry, my only Guards unit and also my only artillery... almost half my entire force.

With some trepidation then, the D6 was thrown and came up a "3" - not good, but not bad either....

DG and I then threw for who was first to move, and DG having won, he proceeded to march his units on to the table via their respective entry points, and in the order he had previously documented. The rule was simple, the units could only arrive in column of march, could not enter the table except behind the previous unit, and could not deploy until the move after they had completely arrived on the table...

Not surprisingly there was a fair amount of marching in column, as speed to the bridge was of the essence and a change of formation would entail unnecessary delay.. The picture above, and at the top of the page, is of DG's column entering at point B, following are my troops entering at point C - you can see that I'd taken the time to shake the cavalry (Nassau-Friesland - Dutch and behind them Alt-Hanover Cuirassiers - Austrian) into line once I'd got far enough on to the table not to impede the infantry marching behind.

Using his Cuirassiers to the full, first blood in the game went to DG, with a full squadron over the bridge, and a second squadron actually on it, well before my guys had even managed to put in an appearance - see picture below - you might imagine that at this point I was getting a bit worried that my column arriving at "D" would have to fight it's way on to the table!

Happily, just as the Cuirassiers exited the bridge, the first of the British column at "D" entered, and I had opted for my cavalry to lead - there then ensued a truly comical comedy of errors as both DG and I threw lousy dice to manage the formation change of our respective squadrons to line (see the blue dice which we use to mark disorganisation in the following!!) and failed completely:

Eventually however, "good training" will out and the first engagement of the game was between the now organised British cavalry and the first squadron of Cuirassiers. Being still disorganised the Cuirassiers didn't bother to fire... and in the subsequent test the Bavarian's threw high, and broke from the melee so badly that they took casualties - score one to the Allies as the cuirassier squadron routed towards "B".

Leaving my units at "D" to make their way onto the board and face off DG's units arriving from "B", I decided to try something a little different on my left flank, and with all the forces having arrived on the table from entry "C" I sent them across the river, fording just by the church - in retrospect this was a foolish move, but at the time it seemed like a sound plan to break the deadlock of trying to fight on narrow frontages across the bridge.

Unfortunately the attack came to nothing, and I guess it was from this point that the British dice started to turn against them... firstly, I had sent too few units - an attack of that type really needs some weight behind it, and three battalions was not enough.
  • One of the regiments (Rechteren - first battle and suffering from "new unit" syndrome!) was hit by the French artillery, was pushed back, and then routed (could I throw under 5 on one D6?? Could I heck as like....)
  • The second unit was then hit by the artillery, made it to the church wall, but was faced by overwhelming French units - including the wild geese who were definitely not suffering from "new unit syndrome"! Cue them to break as well.....
  • The third unit (Stirler's - Swiss in Dutch pay) occupied the church and then came out to face the hordes - surprisingly they drove the French regiment directly to their front off with casualties - but by the time this happened it was too little too late...
Rechteren take cover in the church yard
End of the battle and Stirler's stand proudly in front of the church - the French regiment they had driven off can be seen at the table edge, but now recovered and ready to come back at them..

The main focus of the battle had shifted to the British right flank and the open area between "D" and "B" - DG and I battled for some considerable time in that little part of Flanders!

First success went to the British (this was just before the turning point mentioned above!) with the British cavalry (fresh from their success against the Cuirassiers) driving off the French cavalry (De Montreval).

The Foot Guards who had come up with the cavalry to help provide an overlap, then charged and drove off the first of the French regiments (Toulouse). Unfortunately any further success, however, was not to be...

First the cavalry were driven off by one of the French regiments and then the Guards began to slow down - good as they were they couldn't take on the whole of the French army on their own, and Ingoldsby's who had come up in support were also driven off in rout following some devastating shooting. Three prime units all running for the board edge, and could I still throw under 4 or 5 for a morale recovery? I refer you to my previous response....!

The Dutch cavalry seeing the previously routed cuirassier squadron forming then launched a ferocious charge while still in column and contacted them on the flank - unable to return fire the Cuirassiers were routed for the second time, and the Dutch pursued inflicting further damage until they in turn were attacked by the now recovered De Montreval and driven off in their turn..

British morale was now at a considerable low - the dice were definitely not playing ball, and I could not get any momentum going in the attack. In such situations there's only one thing to do - so I put the kettle on...

Following refreshments and reflection I decided the next steps - the objective was the bridge and I was going to make damn sure I got to a point where I could deny the dastardly French the victory...

By this time the last British battalion had come on, with the artillery just in front of them. The artillery deployed, opened fire, and then proceeded to hit very little (damn dice again), but the one bright spot in the British firmament was the attack by Meredith's across the bridge.

DG had finally managed to get the second squadron of Cuirassiers off the bridge and had brought up the Royal Italiene to hold his end of the span - up came Meredith's, flags flying, drums and fifes going for all they were worth. Marched across the bridge, and a devastating volley from the French sent them back... pausing only to recover their morale, shake themselves down, pick up their brigadier for additional moral support, and strike out again - back over they went...

This time the Royal Italiene missed, but not only that, so did the French artillery.... even more unlikely, the Royal Italiene then failed their test to stand and routed away!! Meredith's proudly marched over and took ownership of the inn.... now that's a battle honour in anyone's book!!

Meredith's charge across the bridge..

Unfortunately - that was the end of the battle, with most of my forces scattered DG had ignored Meredith's and sent the wild geese (Lee's) across the bridge to support his other regiments, and I decided that honour was the better part of valour and that I would surrender....
Final situation - Lee's are crossing the bridge to help out the French line, my only available troops are the half strength squadron of horse, and Orkney's who were also under strength...


Post Match Analysis:
  • The game played well but with some huge swings in luck to DG and I; I definitely had the first third of the game, but after that it went wholly DG's way - in one of my moves I threw three separate dice looking to score under 4 or 5 and failed them all - three regiments failed morale! Ah well, such is life when you trust to lady luck to keep an eye on your little metal men.....
  • This is about the eighth or ninth game we've played with these rules now and we didn't have any glaring issues with them - two things I will look into are:
    1. Army break points - I think both DG and I are a long way past fighting to the last man. We both agreed that in a scenario like this then my army should have broken a lot earlier than it did - one of the idea's we have is to steal the simple mechanism they use in the Blitzkrieg Commander set... a break point that is a proportion of the army's strength, with the breakpoint set high or low depending on the level of training of the army..
    2. Attacks/melee's when in column of march - it seems strange that we don't consider the frontage of the attacking unit in a melee situation - one for some further thought..
  • Tea on this occasion was the excellent PG Tips de-caffeinated; I'm now a fan, and am quite willing to admit I was in the wrong about de-caffeinated! The biscuits were a triumph being McVities Oat and Chocolate Chip cookies - and very nice they were as well!

Steve's account of his wargaming activities...
A column of French infantry slogs its way across the hot dusty countryside somewhere in Flanders..Having left you Colonel Pettygrew style, hopefully champing at the bit to find out how the game turned out, I guess you're now wondering what happened...

The Game

First things first - I as the British had to throw for the arrival time of the troops arriving at point D. These were a not insignificant force as they were comprised of some good, solid, British infantry, my only Guards unit and also my only artillery... almost half my entire force.

With some trepidation then, the D6 was thrown and came up a "3" - not good, but not bad either....

DG and I then threw for who was first to move, and DG having won, he proceeded to march his units on to the table via their respective entry points, and in the order he had previously documented. The rule was simple, the units could only arrive in column of march, could not enter the table except behind the previous unit, and could not deploy until the move after they had completely arrived on the table...

Not surprisingly there was a fair amount of marching in column, as speed to the bridge was of the essence and a change of formation would entail unnecessary delay.. The picture above, and at the top of the page, is of DG's column entering at point B, following are my troops entering at point C - you can see that I'd taken the time to shake the cavalry (Nassau-Friesland - Dutch and behind them Alt-Hanover Cuirassiers - Austrian) into line once I'd got far enough on to the table not to impede the infantry marching behind.

Using his Cuirassiers to the full, first blood in the game went to DG, with a full squadron over the bridge, and a second squadron actually on it, well before my guys had even managed to put in an appearance - see picture below - you might imagine that at this point I was getting a bit worried that my column arriving at "D" would have to fight it's way on to the table!

Happily, just as the Cuirassiers exited the bridge, the first of the British column at "D" entered, and I had opted for my cavalry to lead - there then ensued a truly comical comedy of errors as both DG and I threw lousy dice to manage the formation change of our respective squadrons to line (see the blue dice which we use to mark disorganisation in the following!!) and failed completely:

Eventually however, "good training" will out and the first engagement of the game was between the now organised British cavalry and the first squadron of Cuirassiers. Being still disorganised the Cuirassiers didn't bother to fire... and in the subsequent test the Bavarian's threw high, and broke from the melee so badly that they took casualties - score one to the Allies as the cuirassier squadron routed towards "B".

Leaving my units at "D" to make their way onto the board and face off DG's units arriving from "B", I decided to try something a little different on my left flank, and with all the forces having arrived on the table from entry "C" I sent them across the river, fording just by the church - in retrospect this was a foolish move, but at the time it seemed like a sound plan to break the deadlock of trying to fight on narrow frontages across the bridge.

Unfortunately the attack came to nothing, and I guess it was from this point that the British dice started to turn against them... firstly, I had sent too few units - an attack of that type really needs some weight behind it, and three battalions was not enough.
  • One of the regiments (Rechteren - first battle and suffering from "new unit" syndrome!) was hit by the French artillery, was pushed back, and then routed (could I throw under 5 on one D6?? Could I heck as like....)
  • The second unit was then hit by the artillery, made it to the church wall, but was faced by overwhelming French units - including the wild geese who were definitely not suffering from "new unit syndrome"! Cue them to break as well.....
  • The third unit (Stirler's - Swiss in Dutch pay) occupied the church and then came out to face the hordes - surprisingly they drove the French regiment directly to their front off with casualties - but by the time this happened it was too little too late...
Rechteren take cover in the church yard
End of the battle and Stirler's stand proudly in front of the church - the French regiment they had driven off can be seen at the table edge, but now recovered and ready to come back at them..

The main focus of the battle had shifted to the British right flank and the open area between "D" and "B" - DG and I battled for some considerable time in that little part of Flanders!

First success went to the British (this was just before the turning point mentioned above!) with the British cavalry (fresh from their success against the Cuirassiers) driving off the French cavalry (De Montreval).

The Foot Guards who had come up with the cavalry to help provide an overlap, then charged and drove off the first of the French regiments (Toulouse). Unfortunately any further success, however, was not to be...

First the cavalry were driven off by one of the French regiments and then the Guards began to slow down - good as they were they couldn't take on the whole of the French army on their own, and Ingoldsby's who had come up in support were also driven off in rout following some devastating shooting. Three prime units all running for the board edge, and could I still throw under 4 or 5 for a morale recovery? I refer you to my previous response....!

The Dutch cavalry seeing the previously routed cuirassier squadron forming then launched a ferocious charge while still in column and contacted them on the flank - unable to return fire the Cuirassiers were routed for the second time, and the Dutch pursued inflicting further damage until they in turn were attacked by the now recovered De Montreval and driven off in their turn..

British morale was now at a considerable low - the dice were definitely not playing ball, and I could not get any momentum going in the attack. In such situations there's only one thing to do - so I put the kettle on...

Following refreshments and reflection I decided the next steps - the objective was the bridge and I was going to make damn sure I got to a point where I could deny the dastardly French the victory...

By this time the last British battalion had come on, with the artillery just in front of them. The artillery deployed, opened fire, and then proceeded to hit very little (damn dice again), but the one bright spot in the British firmament was the attack by Meredith's across the bridge.

DG had finally managed to get the second squadron of Cuirassiers off the bridge and had brought up the Royal Italiene to hold his end of the span - up came Meredith's, flags flying, drums and fifes going for all they were worth. Marched across the bridge, and a devastating volley from the French sent them back... pausing only to recover their morale, shake themselves down, pick up their brigadier for additional moral support, and strike out again - back over they went...

This time the Royal Italiene missed, but not only that, so did the French artillery.... even more unlikely, the Royal Italiene then failed their test to stand and routed away!! Meredith's proudly marched over and took ownership of the inn.... now that's a battle honour in anyone's book!!

Meredith's charge across the bridge..

Unfortunately - that was the end of the battle, with most of my forces scattered DG had ignored Meredith's and sent the wild geese (Lee's) across the bridge to support his other regiments, and I decided that honour was the better part of valour and that I would surrender....
Final situation - Lee's are crossing the bridge to help out the French line, my only available troops are the half strength squadron of horse, and Orkney's who were also under strength...


Post Match Analysis:
  • The game played well but with some huge swings in luck to DG and I; I definitely had the first third of the game, but after that it went wholly DG's way - in one of my moves I threw three separate dice looking to score under 4 or 5 and failed them all - three regiments failed morale! Ah well, such is life when you trust to lady luck to keep an eye on your little metal men.....
  • This is about the eighth or ninth game we've played with these rules now and we didn't have any glaring issues with them - two things I will look into are:
    1. Army break points - I think both DG and I are a long way past fighting to the last man. We both agreed that in a scenario like this then my army should have broken a lot earlier than it did - one of the idea's we have is to steal the simple mechanism they use in the Blitzkrieg Commander set... a break point that is a proportion of the army's strength, with the breakpoint set high or low depending on the level of training of the army..
    2. Attacks/melee's when in column of march - it seems strange that we don't consider the frontage of the attacking unit in a melee situation - one for some further thought..
  • Tea on this occasion was the excellent PG Tips de-caffeinated; I'm now a fan, and am quite willing to admit I was in the wrong about de-caffeinated! The biscuits were a triumph being McVities Oat and Chocolate Chip cookies - and very nice they were as well!

Posted originally: 2008-10-19 23:21:00
Oct21

Sudan Officer Material

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Zseto Kreuz Die Cast Store & Collezione, Syndicated Blogs

The paintbrushes have been flashing in Steve-the-Wargamers wargames room (which in my house is also known as the loft...), as I apply paint to some figures that have been found to be seriously missing in my recent Sudan games... Imperial command figures.

My Sudan rules allow for three levels of command, but happily only two of which need to be represented on the table, namely senior commanders (second level) and brigadier commanders (top level); the other level of command is assumed to be present within the unit as represented. Up until now I haven't had any officer figures, but the brief flurry of activity has gone a little way towards remedying this...

In my rules brigadier commanders control small groups of units (up to five usually), senior commanders command the force in its entirety. The following figures are painted to represent those officers from the British army seconded to the Egyptian army from 1883 onwards to oversee it's training, so will probably command groups of Egyptian or Sudanese troops..
..having said that, officers in the Sudan seemed to have a fair amount of leeway in the uniform stakes, so I might very well press them into service to command British troops as well.

Together with a hard core of veteran British NCO's, these officers were so successful that they brought the Egyptian and Sudanese battalions up to the point where they could stand in the firing line and hold their own with the best of any of the British regiments.

Many of these officers were unknown, working hard behind the scenes with little recognition, but there are a few stand out names; Hunter (who commanded the Egyptian Division at Omdurman), Lewis, Collinson and perhaps the best known of them "Fighting Mac" MacDonald...

MacDonald was an amazing character - and that in the Sudan where "characters" seem to have been two a penny! Not surprisingly with that name, he was a Scotsman, and had joined the Gordon Highlanders in 1870 at the age of 17. His rise through the ranks was rapid to say the least, and during the Afghan War of 1879 (when he had already been a colour sergeant for 4 years!) he distinguished himself so much that he was given an officer's commission. He served as a subaltern in the First Boer War (and was captured at Majuba, but his bravery was such that the Boer commander gave him back his sword and freed him), and in 1885 he served under Sir Evelyn Wood in the reorganization of the Egyptian army, and took part in the Nile Expedition of that year. In 1888, he became a regimental captain in the British service (after 18 years service), but continued to serve in the Egyptian army concentrating on training Sudanese troops. In 1889, he received the DSO for his conduct at the Battle of Toski and in 1891, after the action at Tokar, he was promoted major. In 1896, he commanded a brigade of the Egyptian army in the Dongola Expedition, and during the following campaigns he distinguished himself in every engagement, especially in the final Battle of Omdurman (1898) where his Sudanese brigade repulsed a determined attack from the Mahdists. The actions of the brigade "manoeuvring as a unit with the coolness and precision of the parade ground" were witnessed and reported by Winston Churchill. Kitchener acclaimed MacDonald as "the real hero of Omdurman". After the Sudan he went on to serve further, but died tragically, and in somewhat sad circumstances...

Whew... these guys have a job to do to stand up to a reputation like that!
At the same time I also painted up two stands of infantry, as I'd found myself with a half company of Sudanese, and a half company of British left over after my last reorganisation.

First off the Sudanese:
According to my copy of "The Mhadist Wars Source Book" (click here) the Sudanese battalions were recruited from the Southern Sudan and the Nuba Mountains. Many of them were already veterans of the old Egyptian Army who had fought in Mexico and Turkey. Some later served with the Mahdists in the Jihadiyya (the riflemen) under Hamdan Abu Anja, the greatest tactician and general of the Mahdist army.

The first Sudanese battalion, the IXth, was raised from ex-soldiers still in Egypt. The next two, the Xth and XIIIth, were drawn mostly from the survivors of three Sudanese battalions in the Eastern Sudan who had escaped, en masse, from the Mahdists in 1885.

Mine are painted to nominally represent units of the 10th, but the uniform for all the Sudanese battalions were the same so they are interchangeable... figures are 15mm Essex.

Last, and probably least in terms of the picture (they look considerably better on the tabletop) a half company of British regulars to join the ranks of the mythical North Middlesex regiment:
A close up of the paint job doesn't do them any favours - I'm also not a huge fan of the figure either as the pose seems a little stiff and they also have thin ankles...! Figures are 15mm Lancashire.

Steve's account of his wargaming activities...
The paintbrushes have been flashing in Steve-the-Wargamers wargames room (which in my house is also known as the loft...), as I apply paint to some figures that have been found to be seriously missing in my recent Sudan games... Imperial command figures.

My Sudan rules allow for three levels of command, but happily only two of which need to be represented on the table, namely senior commanders (second level) and brigadier commanders (top level); the other level of command is assumed to be present within the unit as represented. Up until now I haven't had any officer figures, but the brief flurry of activity has gone a little way towards remedying this...

In my rules brigadier commanders control small groups of units (up to five usually), senior commanders command the force in its entirety. The following figures are painted to represent those officers from the British army seconded to the Egyptian army from 1883 onwards to oversee it's training, so will probably command groups of Egyptian or Sudanese troops..
..having said that, officers in the Sudan seemed to have a fair amount of leeway in the uniform stakes, so I might very well press them into service to command British troops as well.

Together with a hard core of veteran British NCO's, these officers were so successful that they brought the Egyptian and Sudanese battalions up to the point where they could stand in the firing line and hold their own with the best of any of the British regiments.

Many of these officers were unknown, working hard behind the scenes with little recognition, but there are a few stand out names; Hunter (who commanded the Egyptian Division at Omdurman), Lewis, Collinson and perhaps the best known of them "Fighting Mac" MacDonald...

MacDonald was an amazing character - and that in the Sudan where "characters" seem to have been two a penny! Not surprisingly with that name, he was a Scotsman, and had joined the Gordon Highlanders in 1870 at the age of 17. His rise through the ranks was rapid to say the least, and during the Afghan War of 1879 (when he had already been a colour sergeant for 4 years!) he distinguished himself so much that he was given an officer's commission. He served as a subaltern in the First Boer War (and was captured at Majuba, but his bravery was such that the Boer commander gave him back his sword and freed him), and in 1885 he served under Sir Evelyn Wood in the reorganization of the Egyptian army, and took part in the Nile Expedition of that year. In 1888, he became a regimental captain in the British service (after 18 years service), but continued to serve in the Egyptian army concentrating on training Sudanese troops. In 1889, he received the DSO for his conduct at the Battle of Toski and in 1891, after the action at Tokar, he was promoted major. In 1896, he commanded a brigade of the Egyptian army in the Dongola Expedition, and during the following campaigns he distinguished himself in every engagement, especially in the final Battle of Omdurman (1898) where his Sudanese brigade repulsed a determined attack from the Mahdists. The actions of the brigade "manoeuvring as a unit with the coolness and precision of the parade ground" were witnessed and reported by Winston Churchill. Kitchener acclaimed MacDonald as "the real hero of Omdurman". After the Sudan he went on to serve further, but died tragically, and in somewhat sad circumstances...

Whew... these guys have a job to do to stand up to a reputation like that!
At the same time I also painted up two stands of infantry, as I'd found myself with a half company of Sudanese, and a half company of British left over after my last reorganisation.

First off the Sudanese:
According to my copy of "The Mhadist Wars Source Book" (click here) the Sudanese battalions were recruited from the Southern Sudan and the Nuba Mountains. Many of them were already veterans of the old Egyptian Army who had fought in Mexico and Turkey. Some later served with the Mahdists in the Jihadiyya (the riflemen) under Hamdan Abu Anja, the greatest tactician and general of the Mahdist army.

The first Sudanese battalion, the IXth, was raised from ex-soldiers still in Egypt. The next two, the Xth and XIIIth, were drawn mostly from the survivors of three Sudanese battalions in the Eastern Sudan who had escaped, en masse, from the Mahdists in 1885.

Mine are painted to nominally represent units of the 10th, but the uniform for all the Sudanese battalions were the same so they are interchangeable... figures are 15mm Essex.

Last, and probably least in terms of the picture (they look considerably better on the tabletop) a half company of British regulars to join the ranks of the mythical North Middlesex regiment:
A close up of the paint job doesn't do them any favours - I'm also not a huge fan of the figure either as the pose seems a little stiff and they also have thin ankles...! Figures are 15mm Lancashire.

Posted originally: 2008-10-21 07:08:00
Oct11

Trafalgar..

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Zseto Kreuz Die Cast Store & Collezione, Syndicated Blogs

More years ago than I care to remember I painted a large batch of Airfix "HMS Victory" and "HMS Shannon" models (click here) with the intent of fighting Napoleonic ship engagements using the rules from Don Featherstone's "Naval Wargames"..

Like many such urges, I expended a lot of energy putting the things together (I can remember the smell of polystyrene glue even today), and painting them, but did not have the skills to turn them into waterline models and couldn't face the thought of playing with them still on those little stands they came with! I can't remember what happened to them in the end, I guess they just went into the bin...

The project may have died a death, but the interest didn't... (as evinced by the large numbers of books on Steve-the-Wargamers shelves by O'Brien, Forester, Llewellyn, Kent, Pope and other authors writing in the 18th Century naval line!) so although I'm not a huge fan of Warhammer historical (though I am more of a fan than I am of plain Warhammer!) the following really did rather catch my imagination:

http://www.warhammer-historical.com/news.asp


I must resist, I must resist....


Steve's account of his wargaming activities...
More years ago than I care to remember I painted a large batch of Airfix "HMS Victory" and "HMS Shannon" models (click here) with the intent of fighting Napoleonic ship engagements using the rules from Don Featherstone's "Naval Wargames"..

Like many such urges, I expended a lot of energy putting the things together (I can remember the smell of polystyrene glue even today), and painting them, but did not have the skills to turn them into waterline models and couldn't face the thought of playing with them still on those little stands they came with! I can't remember what happened to them in the end, I guess they just went into the bin...

The project may have died a death, but the interest didn't... (as evinced by the large numbers of books on Steve-the-Wargamers shelves by O'Brien, Forester, Llewellyn, Kent, Pope and other authors writing in the 18th Century naval line!) so although I'm not a huge fan of Warhammer historical (though I am more of a fan than I am of plain Warhammer!) the following really did rather catch my imagination:

http://www.warhammer-historical.com/news.asp


I must resist, I must resist....


Posted originally: 2008-10-24 13:03:00
Oct16

The earthworks are complete..

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Zseto Kreuz Die Cast Store & Collezione, Syndicated Blogs

Over the weekend I finally managed to get some time to finish the rest of those trenches and redoubts that I started just before the last AWI campaign game:


I'm really pleased with these - the trenches are a touch big for the 15's (despite being a smaller diameter dowel) but not overly so, and ideal for the 25's.. these redoubts are scaled to 15mm for use in War of the Spanish Succession games:

..and now on to the next project; British cavalry for the Sudan. These are another one of those expensive units, as I'll need mounted and dismounted versions, but also a separate unit depicting horse holders to use when they're dismounted.

Onwards and upwards...! :o)

Steve's account of his wargaming activities...
Over the weekend I finally managed to get some time to finish the rest of those trenches and redoubts that I started just before the last AWI campaign game:


I'm really pleased with these - the trenches are a touch big for the 15's (despite being a smaller diameter dowel) but not overly so, and ideal for the 25's.. these redoubts are scaled to 15mm for use in War of the Spanish Succession games:

..and now on to the next project; British cavalry for the Sudan. These are another one of those expensive units, as I'll need mounted and dismounted versions, but also a separate unit depicting horse holders to use when they're dismounted.

Onwards and upwards...! :o)

Posted originally: 2008-10-28 22:10:00
Nov03

Crikey...

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Zseto Kreuz Die Cast Store & Collezione, Syndicated Blogs

..where did that week go?!

It's been half term school holidays in Steve-the-Wargamer's house so last week was pretty busy all round keeping the little heirs occupied... a trip to a local fun park to ride the roller coasters, and a trip to the zoo to see the animals (we like animals!) resulted in a significant lightening of the wallet, aches and pains (I'm too old for roller coasters!) and not a lot of constructive output on the wargaming front... but hey, there is more to life, and I did enjoy the time off...

Painting totals:

A good month (for me!) - feel free to click on any of the pictures/tables for a bigger view:

..wow, 77 points...!

Blog Totals:

I eventually spotted my error last month - no wonder I'd had such a load of visitors - I counted two months worth as one..!

The best news for me is the increase in hits on the Teaser page... the recent mention on the OSW group obviously had a positive effect (thanks Jeff!) but more importantly it's good to see that other people have the same view of the value of Charles Grant's work as I do...



Other stuff..

I've just finished reading the second in the (unofficial) series of books on the British Army by Richard Holmes (click here). "Sahib" is placed (in time order) just after "Redcoat" and just before "Tommy"... not surprisingly (the the title gives it away) this book is about the British army's presence in India from the Seven Years war to just before WWI.

I picked the book up ages and ages ago but had never got round to reading it as it is an absolute monster of a book (almost 600 pages) but was enthused to read it as a result of Bill Protz's photo montage on the adventures of Colonel Pettygree (click here) which is set on the Indian frontier...

I'm glad I did pick it up though, what a good read it turned out to be...!

India was seen by many as the training ground of the British Army due to the sheer number of expeditions, wars, incidents, skirmishes, relief columns etc etc that seemed to be going on almost permanently. The book covers off every aspect of what the British Army experience in India was like what it was like to serve there, how the troops got there, wives, families, the effect of the Mutiny, the relationship between the army and the East India Company both of whom fielded armed forces during the period, sieges, campaigns, cavalry, artillery, and so on and so forth...

An absolutely brilliant read - recommended to anyone with an interest in military history... Steve-the-Wargamer gives this a very good four out of five..

I've also just finished (this morning!) "The Wargame Companion" by Charles S. Grant, which has just been released..

I think this is probably bound for the "classic" wargame book lists as it is an absolute mine of information on the background to wargaming in the Grant household.. he starts off with the wargaming pre-cursor to "The Wargame" which was Amercian Civil War gaming, with some background & some game reports. The best bits are the previously unpublished thoughts of his father on rules design, and his overall approach to the game...

He then launches into the second larger part which is the background on the "The Wargame" - he describes the armies (Lorraine, the Vereingite Frei Stadte or VFS, and Peter Young's country whose name escapes me as it was very long and Germanic!!), the regimental histories, and also a number of the battles and campaign details. He describes in more detail a number of rules where confusion has existed in the past, but also gives additional rules that were never documented at the time for space reasons (sieges, fortress artillery, naval engagements etc.)... my favourite part of this section were the stories about the shenanigans Peter Young got up to (nocturnal visits to the wargame table, and introducing a young Charles Grant to King Edwards and whiskey!)

The last part, deals with "gubbins" or the minutiae of their gaming - terrain, houses, boats, how to write "Teasers", and best of all an entire Teaser to play at your convenience... with the latter there is definitely the germ of a scenario idea for me...!

Unashamedly recommended; Steve-the-Wargamer gives this a (queue fanfare) five out of five..

I have the day off tomorrow - work is due to start on the Sudan British cavalry, and for reading material I just picked up a copy of "Biggles in France" from the library... can't remember the last time I read Biggles!

Steve's account of his wargaming activities...
..where did that week go?!

It's been half term school holidays in Steve-the-Wargamer's house so last week was pretty busy all round keeping the little heirs occupied... a trip to a local fun park to ride the roller coasters, and a trip to the zoo to see the animals (we like animals!) resulted in a significant lightening of the wallet, aches and pains (I'm too old for roller coasters!) and not a lot of constructive output on the wargaming front... but hey, there is more to life, and I did enjoy the time off...

Painting totals:

A good month (for me!) - feel free to click on any of the pictures/tables for a bigger view:

..wow, 77 points...!

Blog Totals:

I eventually spotted my error last month - no wonder I'd had such a load of visitors - I counted two months worth as one..!

The best news for me is the increase in hits on the Teaser page... the recent mention on the OSW group obviously had a positive effect (thanks Jeff!) but more importantly it's good to see that other people have the same view of the value of Charles Grant's work as I do...



Other stuff..

I've just finished reading the second in the (unofficial) series of books on the British Army by Richard Holmes (click here). "Sahib" is placed (in time order) just after "Redcoat" and just before "Tommy"... not surprisingly (the the title gives it away) this book is about the British army's presence in India from the Seven Years war to just before WWI.

I picked the book up ages and ages ago but had never got round to reading it as it is an absolute monster of a book (almost 600 pages) but was enthused to read it as a result of Bill Protz's photo montage on the adventures of Colonel Pettygree (click here) which is set on the Indian frontier...

I'm glad I did pick it up though, what a good read it turned out to be...!

India was seen by many as the training ground of the British Army due to the sheer number of expeditions, wars, incidents, skirmishes, relief columns etc etc that seemed to be going on almost permanently. The book covers off every aspect of what the British Army experience in India was like what it was like to serve there, how the troops got there, wives, families, the effect of the Mutiny, the relationship between the army and the East India Company both of whom fielded armed forces during the period, sieges, campaigns, cavalry, artillery, and so on and so forth...

An absolutely brilliant read - recommended to anyone with an interest in military history... Steve-the-Wargamer gives this a very good four out of five..

I've also just finished (this morning!) "The Wargame Companion" by Charles S. Grant, which has just been released..

I think this is probably bound for the "classic" wargame book lists as it is an absolute mine of information on the background to wargaming in the Grant household.. he starts off with the wargaming pre-cursor to "The Wargame" which was Amercian Civil War gaming, with some background & some game reports. The best bits are the previously unpublished thoughts of his father on rules design, and his overall approach to the game...

He then launches into the second larger part which is the background on the "The Wargame" - he describes the armies (Lorraine, the Vereingite Frei Stadte or VFS, and Peter Young's country whose name escapes me as it was very long and Germanic!!), the regimental histories, and also a number of the battles and campaign details. He describes in more detail a number of rules where confusion has existed in the past, but also gives additional rules that were never documented at the time for space reasons (sieges, fortress artillery, naval engagements etc.)... my favourite part of this section were the stories about the shenanigans Peter Young got up to (nocturnal visits to the wargame table, and introducing a young Charles Grant to King Edwards and whiskey!)

The last part, deals with "gubbins" or the minutiae of their gaming - terrain, houses, boats, how to write "Teasers", and best of all an entire Teaser to play at your convenience... with the latter there is definitely the germ of a scenario idea for me...!

Unashamedly recommended; Steve-the-Wargamer gives this a (queue fanfare) five out of five..

I have the day off tomorrow - work is due to start on the Sudan British cavalry, and for reading material I just picked up a copy of "Biggles in France" from the library... can't remember the last time I read Biggles!

Posted originally: 2008-11-03 13:10:00
Nov09

Sudan British Cavalry - part 1..

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Zseto Kreuz Die Cast Store & Collezione, Syndicated Blogs

Apologies for the lack of posts recently - I can only offer the excuse that work and family have made life a bit busy lately... but it doesn't mean some stuff hasn't been going on in the background!

Without further ado then, please welcome the first bases in what will be a troop of British cavalry destined for the Sudan..

What you see here represents two thirds of the bases I need to represent a troop - specifically, the horse holders (that mark the point where the unit switches between mounted and dismounted) and the troop in dismounted mode forming a firing line..

I lifted my organisational elements direct from the old Peter Gilder rules that he described all those years ago in "Wargamers World" so in this instance the three bases represent about 60 men. Two or three troops would then represent a squadron depending on how strong the squadron actually was.

This troop is painted wearing grey frock coats and bedford cord trousers with puttee's - according to my sources (the excellent Perry site - click here) they would stand in quite nicely as the 19th Hussars but I'm increasingly happy with the idea of having imaginary unit names so I may add them to the roster as a fictitious unit along the lines of the North Middlesex Regiment who featured in the recent "Tarka" scenario

The figures are from the incomparable Peter Pig 15mm Sudan range.

Steve's account of his wargaming activities...
Apologies for the lack of posts recently - I can only offer the excuse that work and family have made life a bit busy lately... but it doesn't mean some stuff hasn't been going on in the background!

Without further ado then, please welcome the first bases in what will be a troop of British cavalry destined for the Sudan..

What you see here represents two thirds of the bases I need to represent a troop - specifically, the horse holders (that mark the point where the unit switches between mounted and dismounted) and the troop in dismounted mode forming a firing line..

I lifted my organisational elements direct from the old Peter Gilder rules that he described all those years ago in "Wargamers World" so in this instance the three bases represent about 60 men. Two or three troops would then represent a squadron depending on how strong the squadron actually was.

This troop is painted wearing grey frock coats and bedford cord trousers with puttee's - according to my sources (the excellent Perry site - click here) they would stand in quite nicely as the 19th Hussars but I'm increasingly happy with the idea of having imaginary unit names so I may add them to the roster as a fictitious unit along the lines of the North Middlesex Regiment who featured in the recent "Tarka" scenario

The figures are from the incomparable Peter Pig 15mm Sudan range.

Posted originally: 2008-11-09 22:40:00
Nov11

Champagne Regiment...

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Zseto Kreuz Die Cast Store & Collezione, Syndicated Blogs

Have just finished another regiment...please click on any of the pictures for a bigger view.This regiment was among the most senior regiments in the French army, and was a member of that group of that group of regiments known as the €œVieux Corps€. Regiment Champagne could trace their regimental ancestry back to 1569 and the reign of Henry II (along with the Picardie & Piémont regiments). Altogether though there were six regiments considered €œvieux€, these three, plus Navarre, de la Marine, Normandie.

The regiment was originally created from four company€™s of the Royal Guard (Gardes du Roi) and as expected had a fairly eventful War of the Spanish Succession. The Champagne regiment was first mentioned in the battle of Dormans in 1575 and later on in 1580 at the siege of La Fere under Henri II. In 1595 the Champagne regiment was present at the siege of the castle of Beaune and the siege of Dijon.

In March-April 1691 the Champagne regiment participated in the siege of Mons with four battalions. In 1692 the Champagne regiment was on the extreme right near Namur. During the war of the Spanish Succession the regiment was first commanded by €œthe famous Blainville€ (but he died in 1702)

At Blenheim they served in Bligny€™s Brigade (Marquis de Bligny) where they comprised three battalions with one battalion of the Saintonge regiment. Bliny€™s were in the division of Marechal de Camp Dorrington, in Lieutenant General the Marquis de Blainville€™s Corps.

For the battle they were positioned in the village of Oberglau where they played a key part in in the repulse of the Prince of Holstein-Beck€™s assault.

At Blenheim they were commanded by a gentleman called the Marquis de Seignelay (1683 - 1712) who had taken command of the regiment in 1702 (at the age of nineteen!) There isn€™t much information on the man himself, but in the following picture the little boy on the left in armour is believed to be him.

The picture is titled the €œThe Marquise de Seignelay and Two of her Sons€ and was painted by Pierre Mignard in 1691. The lady is Catherine-Thérèse de Matignon Thorigny, his mother. She had married his father Jean-Baptiste-Antoine (the Marquis de Seignelay) in 1679, but this was painted the year after he€™d died.

His father (that's him to the left) was the eldest son of the "great Colbert" and immensely wealthy; in addition he was also the second generation of Colbert in charge of the French navy €“ reading Wikipedia and other sources, the family had immense power & €œinterest€ in the court of Louis XiV and this (together with the money) may explain how Colbert junior found himself in command of a vieux corps regiment at such a young age.

In 1712 the regiment was taken over by the chevalier de Tessé which coincides with the death date of Seignelay €“ I€™ve not managed to find out any information at all on his death but one is forced to the conclusion that he may have died in service. After much searching I found that the the regiment was present at the Battle of Denain and my guess would be that he may have died during that battle?

It€™s also worth noting that another member of the Seignelay family took command of the regiment in 1762€¦

Figures are Minifigs 15mm, with the exception of the commanding officer who is one of the new range of figures from Black Hat - he's a little too old to represent Seignelay, but hey, the regiment is also wearing a temporary consignment of red stockings while their more likely grey or white ones are at the laundry!


Other sources:
Histoire de l'ancienne infanterie française

Steve's account of his wargaming activities...
Have just finished another regiment...please click on any of the pictures for a bigger view.This regiment was among the most senior regiments in the French army, and was a member of that group of that group of regiments known as the €œVieux Corps€. Regiment Champagne could trace their regimental ancestry back to 1569 and the reign of Henry II (along with the Picardie & Piémont regiments). Altogether though there were six regiments considered €œvieux€, these three, plus Navarre, de la Marine, Normandie.

The regiment was originally created from four company€™s of the Royal Guard (Gardes du Roi) and as expected had a fairly eventful War of the Spanish Succession. The Champagne regiment was first mentioned in the battle of Dormans in 1575 and later on in 1580 at the siege of La Fere under Henri II. In 1595 the Champagne regiment was present at the siege of the castle of Beaune and the siege of Dijon.

In March-April 1691 the Champagne regiment participated in the siege of Mons with four battalions. In 1692 the Champagne regiment was on the extreme right near Namur. During the war of the Spanish Succession the regiment was first commanded by €œthe famous Blainville€ (but he died in 1702)

At Blenheim they served in Bligny€™s Brigade (Marquis de Bligny) where they comprised three battalions with one battalion of the Saintonge regiment. Bliny€™s were in the division of Marechal de Camp Dorrington, in Lieutenant General the Marquis de Blainville€™s Corps.

For the battle they were positioned in the village of Oberglau where they played a key part in in the repulse of the Prince of Holstein-Beck€™s assault.

At Blenheim they were commanded by a gentleman called the Marquis de Seignelay (1683 - 1712) who had taken command of the regiment in 1702 (at the age of nineteen!) There isn€™t much information on the man himself, but in the following picture the little boy on the left in armour is believed to be him.

The picture is titled the €œThe Marquise de Seignelay and Two of her Sons€ and was painted by Pierre Mignard in 1691. The lady is Catherine-Thérèse de Matignon Thorigny, his mother. She had married his father Jean-Baptiste-Antoine (the Marquis de Seignelay) in 1679, but this was painted the year after he€™d died.

His father (that's him to the left) was the eldest son of the "great Colbert" and immensely wealthy; in addition he was also the second generation of Colbert in charge of the French navy €“ reading Wikipedia and other sources, the family had immense power & €œinterest€ in the court of Louis XiV and this (together with the money) may explain how Colbert junior found himself in command of a vieux corps regiment at such a young age.

In 1712 the regiment was taken over by the chevalier de Tessé which coincides with the death date of Seignelay €“ I€™ve not managed to find out any information at all on his death but one is forced to the conclusion that he may have died in service. After much searching I found that the the regiment was present at the Battle of Denain and my guess would be that he may have died during that battle?

It€™s also worth noting that another member of the Seignelay family took command of the regiment in 1762€¦

Figures are Minifigs 15mm, with the exception of the commanding officer who is one of the new range of figures from Black Hat - he's a little too old to represent Seignelay, but hey, the regiment is also wearing a temporary consignment of red stockings while their more likely grey or white ones are at the laundry!


Other sources:
Histoire de l'ancienne infanterie française

Posted originally: 2008-11-11 12:40:00
Nov14

Painting Totals software...

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Zseto Kreuz Die Cast Store & Collezione, Syndicated Blogs

Just a short update on the software that I use to track my painting points as a couple of you mentioned them..

The application is called "Points Motivator" and is freeware available from here (click here). The actual download button is on the left at the top...

Once you've downloaded it there is a full suite of manuals and help pages - when I first set mine up though I had the use of an excellent little tutorial on Mike Cannon's webpages - it's no longer there, I'll drop him an email to see if he can make it available again, but in the meantime I've stripped down the files to the minimum and ZIP'd my installation here:

http://www.box.net/shared/0ij1pnnzt8 (click here to download)

Once you download it to your machine, unzip the folders and then copy them anywhere you want to. Once you've done that go into the main folder and if you double click the pointsmotivator.exe it should start, with my initial set up. Just click "Dismiss" on the little window that comes up after you start the program...

If you think my points values are too high, or too low, then you can modify my settings by
  • clicking on the "item Definitions" option on the command line,
  • select "launch item definition editor" and when the editor opens,
  • click "File" and
  • "Open Item Definition File"
Just select the item you want to change and it opens on the right where you can them modify as you wish..

The definitions I use are stored in a file called "Painting Totals.itemxml" in the "UserItemDefs" folder... it's probably just as easy to open that file with Notepad or somesuch and modify them direct but I've not tested that...

If you want to add a new temporary classification - say for a one off painting project that you're not likely to do again, then click the "Quick Add New Definition" option and it's fairly straight forward.

If you want to add a new permanent classification (say you decided to add a category for painting 6mm's as you'd had a brainwave and bought two of the excellent Baccuss Army packs!) then you go the "item definitions" route previously mentioned but use the "add new item" button at the bottom of the editor.. for a clue as to what to put in the definition boxes, just have a look and see what I put in one of the other items.

Hope that helps - normal service resumed with the next post...

Steve's account of his wargaming activities...
Just a short update on the software that I use to track my painting points as a couple of you mentioned them..

The application is called "Points Motivator" and is freeware available from here (click here). The actual download button is on the left at the top...

Once you've downloaded it there is a full suite of manuals and help pages - when I first set mine up though I had the use of an excellent little tutorial on Mike Cannon's webpages - it's no longer there, I'll drop him an email to see if he can make it available again, but in the meantime I've stripped down the files to the minimum and ZIP'd my installation here:

http://www.box.net/shared/0ij1pnnzt8 (click here to download)

Once you download it to your machine, unzip the folders and then copy them anywhere you want to. Once you've done that go into the main folder and if you double click the pointsmotivator.exe it should start, with my initial set up. Just click "Dismiss" on the little window that comes up after you start the program...

If you think my points values are too high, or too low, then you can modify my settings by
  • clicking on the "item Definitions" option on the command line,
  • select "launch item definition editor" and when the editor opens,
  • click "File" and
  • "Open Item Definition File"
Just select the item you want to change and it opens on the right where you can them modify as you wish..

The definitions I use are stored in a file called "Painting Totals.itemxml" in the "UserItemDefs" folder... it's probably just as easy to open that file with Notepad or somesuch and modify them direct but I've not tested that...

If you want to add a new temporary classification - say for a one off painting project that you're not likely to do again, then click the "Quick Add New Definition" option and it's fairly straight forward.

If you want to add a new permanent classification (say you decided to add a category for painting 6mm's as you'd had a brainwave and bought two of the excellent Baccuss Army packs!) then you go the "item definitions" route previously mentioned but use the "add new item" button at the bottom of the editor.. for a clue as to what to put in the definition boxes, just have a look and see what I put in one of the other items.

Hope that helps - normal service resumed with the next post...

Posted originally: 2008-11-14 13:03:00
Oct09

AUTO ART 1/43 - FORD FOCUS RS - WRC

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, DiecastBox, Syndicated Blogs


This is a model of the Ford Focus as it competeted in the 2003 Monte Carlo rally, driven by Park and Martin. It is presented in special Ford packaging, and the blue oval is very well represented on the car too! Neat bonnet vents and fabulous tampo printing make this a treat.

Youkonton Ratarasarn is the Diecastman
Apr28

~~~Kitty,Bunny,Polar Bear&panda Bear completed and in my ebay store~~~

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Zseto Kreuz Die Cast Store & Collezione, Syndicated Blogs


well here is the gang finally finished and listed in my ebay store for immediate adoption!As you can see they were completely transformed from their before pictures shown below in an earlier post.They are all created from felt with glass eyes and measure 8 inches tall,each made to look whimsical vintage bears&friendsYou can have a peek at all their listings by visiting my ebay store at the link to the right.~~~Thank you~~~sharie ***little kitty ,bunny,polar bear and panda clown have all been adopted~~~thank you!~~Sharie









SReetzbears is a teddy bear artist who has been creating bears since 1996.

well here is the gang finally finished and listed in my ebay store for immediate adoption!As you can see they were completely transformed from their before pictures shown below in an earlier post.They are all created from felt with glass eyes and measure 8 inches tall,each made to look whimsical vintage bears&friendsYou can have a peek at all their listings by visiting my ebay store at the link to the right.~~~Thank you~~~sharie ***little kitty ,bunny,polar bear and panda clown have all been adopted~~~thank you!~~Sharie









Posted originally: 2009-09-08 05:39:00
Apr27

1963 CADILLAC FROM THE MOVIE SCARFACE

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Diecast From Films, Syndicated Blogs

Scarface is a 1983 film directed by Brian De Palma, written by Oliver Stone and starring Al Pacino as Tony Montana. A loose remake of the 1932 Howard Hawks gangster film of the same title, it tells the story of a fictional Cuban refugee, who comes to Florida in 1980 as a result of the Mariel Boatlift.

Montana becomes a gangster against the backdrop of the 1980s cocaine boom. The film chronicles his rise to the top of Miami's criminal underworld and subsequent downfall in Greek tragedy fashion. The film is dedicated to Howard Hawks and Ben Hecht, who were the writers of the original Scarface.

The critical response to the film was mixed and received criticism for the violence and graphic language. Despite this, the film did well at the box office and has since gathered a cult following. Scarface has become an important cultural icon for many rap artists and fans, inspiring posters, clothing, and many other references. The film's grainy black and white poster is a very popular decoration and is still in production.




This is THE classic Series 62 1963 Cadillac from the movie SCARFACE in all its lemon-yellow tacky tiger-striped-upholstery black comedy hideousness. A must-have for any die-cast collector with a sense of humor, this 1:18 scale model comes complete with a bronzed engine block, opening doors, hood and trunk, with all the usual attention to style and detail you would expect to find from Jada Toys and best of all, a 1:18 figurine of Al Pacino as Tony Montana in a white disco suit clutching a Monte Cristo # 9. If you're a fan of SCARFACE you will love owning this. See More.

1963 Scarface Cadillac Convertible with Figure in 1:24 Scale

This '63 Scarface Cadillac Convertible showcases extreme detail, fresh designs and superb craftsmanship. Designed in 1:24 scale, this unique collectible features a die-cast chromed engine, huge custom wheels, a detailed interior and moveable parts. Measures 9.5" x 2.25" x 3.15".




1963 Scarface Cadllac Convertible with Figure in 1:64 Scale

Recreate your favorite moments from the movie "Scarface" with this 1:64 scale 1963 Cadillac Convertible. Scaled figure of Tony Montana is included. Measures 3.75" x 1.25" x 1".

Tudiecast knows his movies and diecasts
Apr11

Fahrenheit Jagermeister

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, ECM's VWs, Syndicated Blogs

Lazy Customs Series

It€™s rainy days here in the tropics€¦.
not a good time for doing customs. (Yawn)
Squeezing time during rare hours that€™s sunny,
I was able to do this one that is based
on the Golf GTI V Fahrenheit Edition,

Kudos to Matchbox for doing a spot-on version
and inspired me to transform one for my
€˜Lazy Customs€™ home-made collection.

Fast Orange VW

Komenda Racing GTI 5

I€™m liking the all black wheels!

Again, €œNo rivet was harm€ in the making of Lazy Custom :-)

Erwin 'Komenda' write about all things VW related
Apr09

Jim Clark - Revival

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Automobil Art, Syndicated Blogs


Prismacolor pencils on gray archival stock 22.5"x 11"
© Paul Chenard 2008


Jim Clark died tragically 40 years ago this year.
He crashed in an F2 race at the Hockenheimring in Germany in a Lotus 48.

The 5th Jim Clark - Revival will be held from the 24- 27 of April, 2009 in Hockenheim, Germany.
You can get information at the following website: http://www.jimclark-revival.com/index.php?id=15&L=1

In the above sketch, Jim Clark is racing a Lotus 33 to a win of the Solitude F1 race in 1964. Left to right, we find Clark, second place finisher John Surtees in a Ferrari 158, Graham Hill in a BRM P261 and Sir Jack Braham in a Brabham BT7-Climax. Both Hill and Brabham crashed out in the race; Surtees finished the year as F1 Driver's World Champion. In fact, everyone here was a Driver's World Champion. Clark took it in 1963 and 1965, Hill took it in 1962 and 1968, and Brabham took it in 1959, 1960 and 1966. Brabham also took it as a Constructor in 1966 and 1967. Lots of talent in one place!


Mar13

New Release (17 October 2009)

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, World of Tomica, Syndicated Blogs


___________________________________________



37-Coca-Cola Event Car




82-Suzuki Lapin




Gift Set: Tunneling Set
- Kabaya System Machinery Boomheader RH-10J-SS
- Hitachi Construction Machinery Wheel Loader ZW220
- Nissan Diesel Quon Mixer Car



LG138-Locomotive Type Bus Seishungo

Starscream collects from Regular Boxes to Box Sets and beyond
Sep26

::Twin Collection ::

Categories // Diecast Vehicles, Diecasters, Syndicated Blogs


My Twin Hotwheels :
-2 Pontiac GTO
-2 Enzo Ferrari
-3 Custom 69 Chevvy

All about a collection of diecast cars - mostly Hot Wheels.