Tags » Nuremberg Toy Fair

I always make sure to stop by the Schreiber-Bogen stand at Nuremberg to check out the amazing paper kits they have on display. These are far from your standard cut-out-and-glue-together one-dimensional models! Here's what they had this year:





A slight change of pace; here's a better pic of the other side of our stand, showing the display case we had containing vintage toys of all varietes as a way to show off ToyPedia's capabilities!





This year as always, CMC had lots of great models on show, including Bugatti Roadsters in a variety of versions:









There are lots of great models at Nuremberg, but there is a tendency for some companies to play it a bit safe - you do see an awful lot of model Audi R8s, Lamborghini Reventons and similar. So I always look round for something that stands out as unusual or which I haven't seen before and the Spark/Bizarre stand had quite a few this year!

To start with, here's their Lotus Elan Estate:





Lots of nice new things coming from AutoArt:







Since these these seem to have sparked so much interest, here's some more on them. 

I talked to Corgi at length about the range; they tell me that the idea is to produce a high-quality toy that's built to last and have a "chunky feel" to it. (these have 50% more diecast in them than competitors, and axles that are 1/3 thicker) and will focus on European vehicles seen on British and European roads, rather than US vehicles, harking back to the sort of vehicles produced by Corgi Juniors in the old days. They'll also focus on "real" vehicles across the range, ie stuff kids will see driving round every day. The range is designed to be educational too, with vehicles like the Army Jackal licensed and given its proper name. 

There are four categories: Military, Construction, Emergency and Agriculture, so the vast majority of vehicles in the range are not cars; there will be a Mini Cooper, a TX4 Taxi and a pain white Discovery and more cars may come later in the range in its second year. If they do, they will also focus on "everyday" cars that a child's parent might drive. Corgi are also considering more category themes, and these may include racing, which would mean some racing cars.