Mysterious Stars

by Autojaune

Contrary to Paolo Rampini’s claims in his, it is unlikely that these models are made by Bapro. They have no manufacturer’s name on them, but it seems certain that they have some sort of tie-in with the Bapro single-seater cars I will be showing in another article in that they were found in Scandinavia (Denmark to be precise). Perhaps surprisingly, though, the Danish book about toys made in Denmark has no reference to these models.





Solido McLaren M8B: a Fantastic Ride!

by Autojaune

The Solido McLaren M8B comes from the last quarter of the 100 series, a time when every new model released by Solido inspired admiration from children and collectors alike. The reasons were simple - at this point the Oulins company’s accurate modeling and wealth of detail raised their simple toys to the level of collector replicas.





One Evening in 1920's Berlin...

by Autojaune

In 1920’s Berlin, the First World War was over, but political and economical instability hung heavily over Germany as it did over much of Europe. As the population sought entertainment to escape the doom and gloom, so the popularity of cabarets rose and the model we see here is promoting a typical Berlin cabaret of this era.





Taxi in Kangaroo Country

by Autojaune

The story of Australia’s Holden begins in 1920 with the Holden Motors Body Builders (HMBB).  This company specialized in assembling cars from Dodge, Buick, Ford, Chevrolet, and Studebaker, as well as several European brands, with the goal of avoiding the high taxes on finished imported goods. At the time, to improve the employment prospects of Australian workers, the government did not levy the same taxes on products built in Australia, even if they were identical to those that might be imported.





An American Truck in Berlin

by Autojaune

Very few collectors have ever heard of this model.  Wiking is, of course, most widely known for its 1/87 scale vehicle models, but the Berlin company did produce a few vehicles in 1/43 scale just after the end of the war. (They had, of course, also made plastic aeroplanes both before and after the war, which were used by the air force to teach pilots how to identify aeroplanes.)





Anyone who has been collecting for so long that they have everything they want (or think they do) will have been confronted by the question of what else they are actually looking for. The trouble is that when you stop looking, you stop collecting! Of course for most of us, we never get to that point since the more you buy, the more you understand how complex the maze of model variants and product changes can get - and that in many cases the number of variants out there is truly infinite! This Solido Bernard truck is a perfect illustration of that!