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TOPIC: The US Army load

The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #1

Platinum Boarder
<p>Looking through my boxes......I found these two old VW Breakdowns, Corgi nr 490.</p>
<p>I already have several ones in my cabinets, so I know how to restore them.</p>
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Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #2

Platinum Boarder
<p>There is a lot to tell about this model. There is an ingenious pulley system in the rear, and a lift off lid showing a lot of tools, all in chrome.</p>
<p>First things first. As Corgi never did an army model of these, that was my plan. What to do?</p>
<p>I could not go to my friend to sandblast the models. In my very early days of restoring I used all sorts of paint stripper, but also I tried to just scrape te paint off. A time consuming job, but the cheapest, and with the few models I did like that, this turned out well.</p>

Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #3

Platinum Boarder
<p>So, here the dismanteling. After drilling the models open, there are two rivets in the rear which hold the pulley system in place.</p>
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Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #4

Platinum Boarder
<p>The system is a two part housing, which also have a trendecy to have a gap in between, Corgi had to make it a two part system because there is a small tyre to put on. It functions as a rotating grip for your finger.</p>
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<p>On one side of the rotating unit here ia spring pressing the unit to one side of the housing.</p>
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Last Edit: 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Keesie.

Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #5

Platinum Boarder
<p>The other side of the pulley has a mechanism with small ridges. The pulley presses against those, and that way the cord, to be mentioned later, can only be WOUND. To UNWIND, you have to release the system by pressing the tire to the other side, so the inside spring is under tension.</p>
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Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #6

Platinum Boarder
<p>I cleaned the systems, put some oil on, and placed new tires.</p>
<p>Now, the upper shells.......</p>
<p>One had the original paint, one was painted over in black. I scrpaed all paint off with a small screwdriver.</p>
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<p>Then I used high grade sandpaper, and finally I cleaned the parts with thinner, to remove all grease, loose remains and dust. The parts were then primered.</p>
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Last Edit: 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Keesie.

Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #7

Platinum Boarder
<p>Here both boxes. A clever trick from Corgi to make it look like there are separate tools!</p>
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<p>The lid is often missing and the hinges are a weak point.</p>
<p>I cut some flexible material for extra support and glued it under the housing.</p>
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Last Edit: 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Keesie.

Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #8

Platinum Boarder
<p>Here the two parts from underneath.</p>
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<p>The seats were then filled with drivers and painted. The legs I don't need.</p>
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Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #9

Platinum Boarder
<p>Here the parts sprayed. One of the bases was like new, the other one was sprayed in primer and finished with clear varnish.</p>
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Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #10

Platinum Boarder
<p>Here all the parts together.</p>
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<p>Here a picture of the base, and how to place/replace the suspension and wheels.</p>
<p>Placing back the suspension a drop of oil in the central part of the bad will help sliding the spring in.</p>
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Last Edit: 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Keesie.

Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #11

Platinum Boarder
<p>As there are now a few members in, they no doubt want me to carry on......</p>
<p>The plastic tool-part clicks into the top shell, only in the front though. As there is always some movement here and there, I secured it with glue on all four corners. The rear hook can just be placed, as it will be secured between base and pulley system.</p>
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<p>The pulley-part was also glued between the two halves but this will never hold on it's own, due to the tension of the inner spring. Also I drilled holes where the rivets were located, and made a 'path' with longer screws.</p>
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Last Edit: 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Keesie.

Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #12

Platinum Boarder
<p>The rear unit placed, pictured from underneath.</p>
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<p>A small bit of the metal of the rear unit goes over the plastic tool-part, securing it in the rear.</p>

Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #13

Platinum Boarder
<p>Here a close up. Now this is where Corgi failed in securing the system completely. I placed arrows where the unit should have been filled up, but it has not. Therefore there is always movement in the unit. Of course it will not fall off the model, but it should not be loose. Therefore I always fill up these holes with either plaster or small parts of wood.</p>
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Last Edit: 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Keesie.

Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #14

Platinum Boarder
<p>Now then, the hooks. The hooks in the picture are all a bit too big. Therefore I bought a bag with 40 or 50 'eyes', and composed some hooks myself. You can see those eyes in the lower right.</p>
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Last Edit: 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Keesie.

Re: The US Army load 1 month, 2 weeks ago #15

Platinum Boarder
<p>Here the hook, openede with pliers, with plastic bead, the cord in between.</p>
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Last Edit: 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Keesie.
The following user(s) said Thank You: lark6
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