1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents
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TOPIC: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents

1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #1

Platinum Boarder
<p>Having been active in slot racing competition on a national and international level for many, many years, I hung up my helmet in 2002, having only raced once since, on a special invitation in 2004.</p>
<p>But quite recently the old slot race virus got stronger and stronger, so in the mean time I have invested time and money to resuscitate the hobby which gave me so much pleasure over so many years. In this topic I will introduce a (growing) number of my 1/32 collection, showing the individual car as well as telling the real life story behind it.</p>
<p>I will start with the Ferrari 275 P. The reason behind this is the fact that this was my first (static) 1/32 slot car related kit, which I got as a birthday present from my sister in 1965. The kit was produced by Monogram, and was one of a series 5 static kits which could easily be converted into a full blood slot race car or bought as a complete ready to run slot racer.</p>
<p>This is the box of the static kit (my first one)</p>
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<p>And this for the ready to run slot car:</p>
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<p>These kits are very rare and collectable items nowadays, hard to find and cost a lot of coin. If I only knew that in 1965.</p>
<p>To be continued.</p>
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Last Edit: 3 years, 2 months ago by Ecclesley.

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #2

Moderator
That looks good. Never seen a 275P scale model

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #3

Platinum Boarder
It is quite amazing how acurate and detailed those models are from the mid 1960's, helped by the fact Monogram were masters at tooling for their plastic kits range.

The premier brand in the UK for decadea was Scalectric but it was not until the late 1980's that their cars could be classed as acurate representations of cars seen on the race track as shown by their Sierra Cosworth below.



Rollerman.

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #4

Platinum Boarder
<p>Before returning to the subject of presenting cars; first I will add some slot racing information in general.<br /><br />Slot racing is a sport/hobby which has its roots mainly in the home race <br />tracks from well known brands like Scalextric, Carrera, Revell, Monogram and Fleischmann.<br />Over the years this home hobby grew larger; clubs were founded and a whole<br />slot race industry with all kinds of specialised performance parts appeared on<br />the market. Brands like K&amp;B, Champion, Pro Slot, Mura, Cox, Strombecker, MRRC etc. popped up.<br />National and international (world)championships were organized.<br />As far as I know it is a real professional sport in Spain.<br />But this hobby has known its ups and downs, at present I think the slot racing <br />scene is looking for stability and young people.<br />Just like the model car and model train hobby, the average age of the participants has<br />risen drastically and very low influx of a younger generation is happening.<br />I am afraid this hobby will suffer in the future.<br /><br />For those not familiair with slot racing. A slot racer is a model car in 1/32 or 1/24 scale.<br />It has a body, separate (adjustable) chassis, an electric 12V motor, axles, gears, wheel, tires and a guide with braids (connected to the motor) which fit/slot into a groove of the track, at the meantime making contact with the<br />metal strips of that track, which are fed by a 12/15V transformer/power booster.<br />This guide steers the car round the track; the 'driver' has a hand controller with a certain resistance with which he can control the speed and braking.<br /><br />To be continued.</p>
Last Edit: 3 years, 2 months ago by Ecclesley.

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #5

Platinum Boarder
<p>Further on the subject of presenting slot cars.<br />So the Monogram Ferrari  275P was available as a static as well as a racing kit in the mid sixties, and the originals are quite rare and expensive now.<br />The next photo shows the static kit with a plastic chassis and bucket seat.<br />
<br />The racing kit is shown with different types of chassis.<br />
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<br />Apart from having built the static model, as a youngster, I never owned or raced such an original car until the late eighties, when I bought a big bunch of 1/32 slot race cars second hand. Some 20 years ago the whole of my collection was sold to a good friend of mine, and can now be found in his (what I call) private slot car museum. The stuff I once owned is there on display, and from time to time we meet and talk slot cars.<br />In the meantime the slot racing scene has undergone a lot of changes in the past two decades. Brands like Fly, SRC, Ninco, NSR, Slot.it and many more haven entered into this business and have produced and/or are still producing a host of slotrace cars/models, many of which are of top quality. Also, 3D printing techniques have made it possible to tailor your car just the exact way you wish. And even so important, they have re-issued a lot of cars of the mid sixties, and one of them is this Monogram 1/32 Ferrari 275P.<br />Both Revell/Monogram and MRRC offered re-issues (sold out in the meantime).<br />
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<br />This one (Revell/Monogram) is now back in my collection:<br />
<br />As to the real life car, the 275P (3,3 ltr. enigine), won the 1964 Le Mans 24 h race in the hands of Jean Guichet and Nino Vaccarella. She was the successor of the 250P (3,0 ltr. enigine, but identical coachwork), which won the 1963 LM 24 hours, driven by: Ludovicio Scarfiotti and Lorenzo Bandini. In other words this car was a very succesfull racer in its days.<br />Here a pic of 1964 winner.<br />
<br /><br />To be continued (with another Monogram Ferrari, a 250 GTO LM).</p>
Last Edit: 3 years, 2 months ago by Ecclesley.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Nobleco, RoutemasterNL

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #6

Platinum Boarder
<p>In this next chapter of slot cars and their real world equivalents, the spot light is on another (ex) Monogram Ferrrari, a 250 GTO 64LM to be precise.<br />When I got that 275P of the previous chapter as a static kit for my birthday in the mid sixties, it was clear to me that I had to have more. <br />Here a picture of 4 of the 5 models offered by Monogram in them days; the fifth, a Lola GT not on this poster.<br />
<br />The Lola GT:<br />
<br />Well don't assume I am a big Ferrari fan, but their cars of the early days are on many racing enthusiast's shortlist, as they are on mine. I my view this GTO 64LM is one of the most beautiful kits ever, even if it is quite simple in construction. But the tooling and the quality of the reproduction are just top shelf.<br />This Monogram model follows the same principles of the previous 275P, either a static kit, (which could easily be converted) or a slot racing assembly; and the originals are very rare and precious to own.<br />The static kit:<br />
<br />The slot race kit:<br />
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<br />I owned several of these original models both static and race ready, but they are now in the same "museum" collection  I mentioned in the previous part.<br />But luckily, again this model has been reissued by Revell/Monogram and MRRC. The latter offers it as a kit. Revell as a 95% ready to run, you only need to attached the body to the chassis, and then you are go. I have both of them, in fact I have three of which two are MRRC kits. They are both very much sold out, so the second market is the place to go. They do not come cheap anymore.<br />The MRRC Kit:<br />
<br />The almost ready to run Revell/Monogram issue:<br />
upload pic<br />Both cars MRRC and Revell side by side:<br />
<br />The kits I bought are both under construction, and as I do not have the facilities to paint/spray the cars myself anymore, I have asked Theo (Routemaster) to perform his magic and help me out.<br />Here the RTR model of my present collection:<br />
<br />The real life car is quite a story. Ask a Ferrari or knowledgeable sportcar fan about a Ferrari 250 GTO and 99 out of 100 will show a twinckle in their eyes.<br />A Ferrari 250 GTO is simply the ESSENCE of a sportscar and is loved worldwide. Ferrari only built 36 of them in the period 1962-1964. And of these 36 cars, seven have the 64LM body like the Monogram model.<br />The real life 1962/63 250GTO:<br />
<br />And the real life "64":<br />
image uploader</p>
<p><br />The racing pedigree of the 250 GTO is way too large to mention, they won about everything in their class round the globe.<br />The chance to own this car in real life is only left to the ultra rich. Last August a 250 GTO was auctioned at over 48 million dollars, but the record stands at 53 million.</p>
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<p>Note to Theo (Routemaster) the drummer of your favorite band Pink Floyd, Nick Mason, owns a 1963 250GTO for quite while now. Nick bought his Ferrari in 1977 for £37,000 using the money coming from the release of The Dark Side Of The Moon album. People were telling him that he was crazy spending this fortune for a car. In 2010 Nick turned down a $30 million offer for the car. He also owns the original British registration plate 250GTO (it is on that car). That plate alone must be worth a million.</p>
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<p>The next chapter will be about the Cooper Ford alias "King Cobra".</p>
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Last Edit: 3 years, 2 months ago by Ecclesley.
The following user(s) said Thank You: RoutemasterNL

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #7

Platinum Boarder
I have seen Nick's GTO when he used to come to the open days in Radlett, England. It was a model shop proprietered by Mr Brian Harvey (still connected to the business) who organised an open day a few times a year for model and real car enthusiasts to all meet up at the shop and have a bloody good natter!

I saw the car parked outside one day and said to Dad it was Nick Masons and he duly took a picture of it. If I had time to sort through 15,000+ colour negatives I could find it for posting here.

Rollerman.

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #8

Platinum Boarder
<p>The next (Monogram again) 1/32nd model presented is the Cooper-Ford, a.k.a. the Shelby King Cobra.<br />
afbeeldngen<br />When it was launched I was not impressed by its looks, in fact I did not like it then as much as I love it now. Again it follows the pattern of being a (easily convertible) static or complete slot race  kit. The first (original) one I really owned was a slot racer somewhere in the late eighties.<br />Here the static kit with the bucket seats. This kit shows a body with the closed rear wheel arches.<br />
affbeeldingen<br />The slot race model however was on sale both with closed and open/widened rear wheel arches, the latter could take much wider tires; aimed to give it a bit more roadholding.<br />
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<br />Here both slot races boxes together:<br />
<br /> If you would ask me how do these Monogram models perform on track? Well in this high tech world of today they stand no chance whatsoever, unless you have a tailor made, 3d printed modern, flexible, angle winder chassis installed with up to date engine performance, better gears and bearings etc. But on a home track or if used simply as a classic racer against similar cars, in its original specification, it will do just fine.<br />The same old story, the originals are collectable, hard to find and pretty expensive (provided they are undamaged and not tampered with.<br />Hurray for Revell/Monogram and MRRC for bringing these cars back to life in this modern era. The Revell/Monogram issue is practically sold out, but a MRRC can still be found.<br />I have the Revell/Monogram model:<br />
foto upload gratis<br />As well as two different MRRC models and a MRRC kit under construction.<br />
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<br />The kit has the wider wheel arches:<br />
<br />What about the real life car. This car started its life in England as a rather timid racing car, called the Cooper Monaco. But it was taken up by Carroll Shelby (the man known for the famous Cobra sportscars) and modified with a big block US Ford V8 engine, therefore it became the Cooper-Ford a.k.a. Shelby King Cobra.<br />
<br />It was a very successful race car in the early sixties, competing in the 1963 USRRC road racing championships, driven by famous men like Al Holbert, Dave McDonald, Ken Miles, Augie Pabst etc. and winning a whole lot.</p>
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<p>It is only rightful to say that the man Shelby was an ace car constructor who succeeded in making the British AC and Cooper sports cars into very potent racing cars/winners. Also the Ford GT40 racing program became a succes only after it was transferred into his hands (winning both 1966 and 1967 Le Mans 24h). Later on it was given back to the Britsh John Wyer team, winning again in 1968 and 1969. More about the GT40 in another episode.<br />To be continued.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /></p>
Last Edit: 3 years, 2 months ago by Ecclesley.
The following user(s) said Thank You: RoutemasterNL

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #9

Platinum Boarder
<p>The next 1/32 slot race cars are from the Spanish brand: FLY. The Spanish ex racing driver Rafael Barrios started the FLY Car Model company in 1996.  The factory was situated in Ibi (Alicante, Spain), where more than 100 people were employed.<br />
<br />Thanks to the high quality of detail, produced by the FLY Car Model company, other slot car  brands were forced to improve their models considerably, in order to compete. FLY has put an enormous number of models on the market in near endless varieties. The range was even further enlarged with the introduction of a second brand: GB Track.<br />
<br />The worldwide economic crisis of 2008 hit Spain very hard and made many casualties, one of them was FLY.  In June 2009 a new start was made unter the name of Flyslot and Slotwings, but unfortunately it was in vain. The legacy of FLY is well appreciated worldwide, their models were just top notch. And because of their quality, the present day manufacturers had big shoes to fill. All in all the whole modern slot racing world benefitted. <br />
<br />For slot race fans and collectors of FLY, the second hand market is the place to go, many bargains still to be found, but a growing number of models is becoming rare and fetch high prices now.<br />The sheer size of the FLY collection can be admired in a (hard to find) book called: FLY, "Un antes y un después en el slot". A 456 page heavy weight book. I found a copy of this book in Singapore for a very low price, I am awaiting its arrival.<br />
<br />I have a growing number of FLY models, I don't use them on track, they are only for display. The ones I present here first, are two FLY Porsche 917LH (LH stands for lang Heck in German, meaning long tail) from 1970 and 1971 respectively. The 1970 blue and white model was used in the Le Mans tests of April 1970, showing a psychedelic paint job, driven by Willy Kauhsen and Gerard Larousse. The second car, light blue and orange, was from the Gulf Porsche team, driven by Jo Siffert and Derek Bell in 1971. By the way the 1971 Le Mans 24 hour was a race I visited and which was won by my fellow country man Gijs van Lennep, in a short tail Porsche 917, smashing the distance record. That record stood for 39 years, before being broken by an Audi in 2010 .<br />
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<br />Regarding the real car. Porsche has been active and very successful in motorsports, from WW II. Up to the mid sixties they only competed and won in the smaller engine capacity races, but gradually  they developed into the higher classes, competing with Ford, Ferrari, Lola, Matra etc. etc. <br />The Porsche 917 was introduced in 1969 with a 4,5 ltr. flat 12 cyl. engine, enlarged to 5,0 ltr. during its lifespan (1971). Those first 917's were like lethal weapons, bloody fast but unstable and dangerous to drive at high speeds. Porsche had a hard time finding able drivers who were willing to risk their lives in this "unguided missile". This was in the pre-wind tunnel aerodynamics era. Only when Porsche asked John Wyer to take over the racing program, the 917 in short tail guise became one of the most successful endurance racers of all time.<br />The 1969 long tail 'dangerous' car:<br />
<br />The long tails, specially developed for the long straight of Le Mans, were they reached over 380 km/h, never won that race. The best they could manage was a second place in 1970.<br />The 1970 second place car:<br />
<br />A similar car also starred in Steve McQueen's famous movie Le Mans. It participated in the real race as well but was a non finisher:<br />
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<br />The 1971 car, 3 entries, no finishers,<br />
<br />More FLY models in the next episode.</p>
Last Edit: 3 years, 2 months ago by Ecclesley.
The following user(s) said Thank You: RoutemasterNL

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #10

Moderator
What a great source of information and knowledge!
The following user(s) said Thank You: Ecclesley

Re: 1/32 scale slot race cars and their real world equivalents 3 years, 2 months ago #11

Platinum Boarder
<p>Further on the subject of FLY slot racing cars.<br />I ended my previous contribution saying that the Porsche 917 racing efforts were transferred to the British John Wyer organization in 1970 after a  very dismal previous year under Porsche Stuttgart management. JW Automotive (JWA), with their vast knowledge of endurance racing and cars, quickly found out that the original long tail Porsche 917 was an utter mistake and a very dangerous car to drive. Well known racing car driver Vic Elford (quick Vic) stated: 'this car is all over the place at high speeds'.<br />Within a matter of a few days, JWA technical men started to operate on the design and came up with a short tail version of the car, which also had a completely re-designed exhaust system. The whole aerodynamic package was now more of a wedge shape, so that the airflow could be better controlled and contained. A half finished design was tested, and it was already 3 secs. a lap faster than the original Porsche 'unguided missile'.<br />When finished and completely tested, the car was an immediate success, but much to JWA's surprise the Porsche organization had also shared this new car with a second works backed racing team: Porsche Salzburg from Austria.<br />Nevertheless it was JWA's team that won seven of the ten 1970 championship races, while the Salzburg team only managed two wins (a.o. the highly prized 24h of Le Mans), the only race Porsche did not win that year was the 12h of Sebring, which went to Ferrari.<br />The 1971 championship season was also won by Porsche, JWA winning five races, the Salzburg team, now sponsored by Martini (alcoholic drinks), won three events. Again, much to JWA's regret, the Le Mans 24 h. went to the Austrian team, their drivers: Helmut Marko (of F1 Red Bull Racing  fame now) and the Dutchman Gijs Van Lennep winning.<br />The long tail version was also re-designed, but used for the 1970 and 1971 Le Mans 24 h race only, where they could manage a second place (1970). Still a somewhat unstable car but much safer and faster.</p>
<p>The 1971 long tail Porsche of Pedro Rodriguez recorded a lap time of 3.13.9 at Le Mans. That time has not been beaten since. Just to show how fast (pre turbo era) this car was</p>
<p><br />The FLY slotrace model car company produced a very large series of 1/32 scale short (kurz in German) tail Porsche 917 K productions. I have two of them. Both are 1970 "Austrian" cars, which differed from the Works JWA Gulf sponsored cars by their more daring paint jobs.<br />
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<br />This is a collectable FLY set of the complete JWA Le Mans team of 1970. This kit now for sale at 225 Euros.<br />
web upload for forums<br />In total about 50 different FLY Porsche 917's are available, some 10 of those were cars used by non works (private) teams. <br />This a private entry by the German Gesipa Racing Team:<br />
share images<br />To be continued.</p>
Last Edit: 3 years, 2 months ago by Ecclesley.
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