My grammophone
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TOPIC: My grammophone

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #31

Platinum Boarder
Hi Keesie, The sound box is on where the needle is attached and is the vibrating "bit" that gets amplified.


The "Books" are Albums which hold 12 records in individual sleeves.


The needles are once only but I seem to remember you could get harder multi use needles. The machine has a small compartment that swings out as you open the lid to store used needles safely, see the last photo.



















Last Edit: 4 years, 6 months ago by Dinkydi.

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #32

Platinum Boarder
That is a nice little portable you have there Malcolm. Is it an Austrailan Product or come from England. I think Mine comes from England. I like the little fold out tray for the used needles. Reminds me of the ash trays or coin holders in my Austin 1100 back in the late 60's early 70's.


Is your wind up? I see a handle that looks like it is in storage and should fit in one of the sides?
Last Edit: 4 years, 6 months ago by Nobleco.

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #33

Platinum Boarder
I have taken some shots of the needles, cactus needle sharpener and the info and some licenses I have for the Radio that I have up stairs.
In structions for the Needle sharpener. The cactus needles could be used from 5 to 15 times depending on the use.






Sharpener below. Put the cactus needle into the chuck and tighten up. Have about 5/16" sticking out. With the needle in place, you turn the disk. There is a knob on the bottom of the round disk that turns it. It has a rubber fluted cover on it for grip. One or two times around and you done. The needle turns and the sand paper disk turns at the same time therefore giving a true point.


Metal needles, single use, are on the right and below are two home made sanding disks you can glue on. These are probably from as late as the 1950's






Back side of the cactus needle envelope





Earliest Radio license I have. I hope you can read some of it. 1929 to 1930, cost $1.00 per year






Back side of the same license








The stack of the rest of the licenses. This is they way I got them when I got the record player and radio.






1934 to 1945 licenses and all $2.00 each per year. Big jump from $1.00/year before.






A couple more from pre 1932 and then the last one I found was 1953. It was $2.50/year by then. A business card from probably the 1950's


Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #34

Platinum Boarder
Guys, thank you so much for showing these. A lot of it is new to me, never heard or seen these wonderful books you show DD. Absolutely stunning, the little gadget to store used needles in! I love all those 'adjusting' parts popping up and sticking out of that machine. The inside of the lid looks 'newer'. So the thing on the front is to choose the speed, the handle can be taken out and placed in one side, to wind up the machine. There is a little 'pointer' towards the Decca sign, what is that for? Does the Decca sign give you the year of manufacture?


If I would not have so many hobbies already, this sure would be another one, collecting grammophones..........


Jim, I repeat, absolutely stunning that you have all this paperwork. So you guys had to pay 1 dollar to listen to the radio for a year. I think we had something similar no doubt, in fact, we pay an amount to watch TV and radio. And that needle sharpener, still in it's box! You have a little museum there!

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #35

Platinum Boarder
This has been a great thread seeing those old players, accesories and records. Record labels fascinate me as I trace their history to find out if they still survive as some of the more obvious ones do.


His Master's Voice=HMV, still going.


RCA Victor=The Victor Company of Japan (JVC), still going.


Brunswick=Universal Music/Sony Music Entertainment, not active, just their back catalogue survives.


and so and so on.


Rollerman.

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #36

Platinum Boarder
The inside of the lid looks newer because it is lacquered and easier to clean but does show evidence having in the past lived in a smokers house. (not me)


The lever on the front shows "slower and faster" the one at the back is the brake.


There is no obvious year of manufacture but there is a serial number.


I have another machine but it is more modern, I bought it some time ago because the cabinet is bakelite. 


Rollerman, the oldest records I have are both Edison records. One is a flat 78 shellac, the other is a cylinder shellac.

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #37

Platinum Boarder
The name 'Edison' being a pioneer in the music reproduction industry did become a proper record label as we would know it Today, but there was no standardisation in disc size, playing times and the way the groove was cut until the late 1920's, so various companies closed down including 'Edison Records', but the name lived on in other activities such as actually making electrical equipment.


The Edison name still survives under the exclusive control of 'Document Records' who have a lot of the back catalogue from 'Edison Records.


Rollerman.

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #38

Platinum Boarder
The record player I have with the radio is an Edison. I did not take a picture of the brass plaque that came off the back of the radio some years ago. Very early in that the radio and record player (not the grammophone) were bought as a pair in 1935. Still works too.

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #39

Platinum Boarder
Very interesting information, you fellas know your gramophones! I enjoyed seeing the old licence documents, nice pieces of social history and thanks for sharing them with us!
The following user(s) said Thank You: Nobleco

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #40

Platinum Boarder
One more thing which always puzzled me: you wind up the grammophone, and an inside spring becomes under tension. When you then play a record, along the time playing, the tension gets less, and therefore the record will then no doubt go slower. Must you then use the speed correction device, or is there an inside corrector which keeps the record at the right speed all the time?

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #41

Platinum Boarder
Early recordings played for only a few minutes, the revelation coming when Edison managed to make a cartridge recording last 4.5 minutes! The spring method when fully wound will last long enough for these short recordings to be played without any noticable drop in pitch as the speed slows.


The speed regulator is in fact for setting the correct speed in the first place guided by the printed speed on the cartridge or disc or paperwork supplied with the disc.


Recordings were recorded from between 60rpm and 90rpm, not the 78rpm we think they all are! so when you see these early machines on TV being operated and a disc is put on and the lovely music starts, this is pure theartre, because the operator would have to read the disc's speed setting, wind up the power, adjust the speed and place the needle on the disc.


Rollerman.

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #42

Platinum Boarder
Thanks for that Kevin. I understand it now. So the speed could be set. Actually they had then more speed variations than the nowadays equipent, with only 33 and 45!

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #43

Platinum Boarder
Keesie wrote:
Thanks for that Kevin. I understand it now. So the speed could be set. Actually they had then more speed variations than the nowadays equipent, with only 33 and 45!
 


Yes indeed they did. No one really knows how we got to accept the 78rpm as a standard speed setting. Some believe it was just coincidence the actual machine chosen when standardisation was being decided was set to 78rpm, so that was chosen!


Rollerman.

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #44

Platinum Boarder
My machine will play at least 2 songs before it starts to slow down and you can hear it slowing. Just wind it up again either during play or at the end of each song or piece. some are quite long at about 5 minutes (classical is a good example) but the machine still plays them fine to the end. Wind up and play another.
I also have a direct drive turn table from the 1970's, and it was state of the art back then being one of the very first direct drive players. It has a strobe light and small squares running around the platter in three lines. One line for 45, one for 33 and one for 78 believe it or not. You can then adjust the speed with the strobe so the little squares stop moving. It is all packed away as I have nothing to connect it to anymore. Still have hundreds of albums between my wife and me

Re: My grammophone 4 years, 6 months ago #45

Platinum Boarder
I find I have 2 cylinder records, one is a black "Gold Moulded" the other is a "Blue Amberol" nitrocellulose record.


The Blue Amberol were made from 1912 to 1929.


Unfortunately I don't have a player to listen to these