Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions
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Whether you're into Lesney Regular Wheels, Superfast, the Tyco Era or modern Mattel Matchbox, here's the place to chat about all things MB!

TOPIC: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #46

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Great topic, enjoying it.

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #47

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Lesney Jaguar XK140 (rare red variant)





The Jaguar XK140 was the successor of the XK120 and was produced between 1954 en 1957, later to be eclipsed by the Jaguar XK150.



Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #48

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Matchbox # 31 Ford GT 40 Superfast:





When Ferrari scored its 3rd consecutive win at the Le Mans 24h race in 1962, it was Henry Ford II who said that he was going to beat those bloody red Italian cars.
And when H.F. spoke those words, it was like the walls of the Dearborn, Michigan H.Q. building were shaking. Relevant managers stumbled over each other; it was utter pandemonium. H.F. even went so far saying that he wanted to make an attempt to buy Ferrari.

Negotiations started, but top brass people from Ford soon found out that Enzo "Il Commendatore" Ferrari was no push around, and the deal fell through. The determination of Ford to beat Ferrari at Le Mans grew even bigger.

So Ford decided to build their own car and made contact with Eric Broadley of Lola Cars Ltd. at Bromley as well as with John Wyer, ex-team manager from Aston Martin. Broadley had build the Lola GT car with a Ford V8; Ford bought two Lola chassis for further development.
Ford also approached Colin Chapman of Lotus, with whom they shared a lot of success at the Indianapolis 500, but they soon found out that Lotus lacked the capabilities needed for the Le Mans project.
The co-operation between Ford and Lola Cars came to a quick end, and instead Ford set up their own Ford Advanced Vehicles plant at Slough in the West Greater London area, involving technical staff from both the UK and the USA.

The Lola GT. Note: about 90% of center section of this car was transferred into the Ford GT40 design.





In 1964 the Ford GT 40 MK I saw the light of day and in May of that year the car was debuted to race at the Nürburgring 1000 KM, driven by Phil Hill and Bruce McLaren. They abandoned the race after 15 laps. In June, Ford Motor Co. entered three GT 40's at the Le Mans 24 h. All three dropping out, although Ritchie Ginther, driving the #11 car was in the lead of the race from lap 2 until his first pit stop. The lousy Colotti transmission being the achilles heel of the GT40.





After a dismal 1964 season under John Wyer's supervision, the whole GT40 racing operation was transferred to Shelby American Inc., managed by Carroll Shelby. Slough remained active in building the GT 40 (MK III) road cars. Colotti was dumped and ZF Transmission became the new gear box supplier.

Right from the start in 1965, the Shelby squad was succesfull, winning first time out at the Daytona 2000. However success at Le Mans eluded them and Ferrari scored their 6th consecutive win.
In 1966 an armada of Ford GT 40's. MKI (4,2 ltr.) and MKII (7 ltr.) cars started the Le Mans race and this time Henry Ford witnessed a clean sweep by Ford, finishing first, second and third. The Ferrari supremacy broken.







A Ford GT 40 with a MK IV body  (7 ltr. engine) won again at Le Mans in 1967.



Changing rules made the Ford 7 ltr. car obsolete from 1968, so the MK I GT40 was re-instated under Gulf sponsored John Wyer management. Ford's finest hour came in 1968 and 1969 winning both Le Mans 24 h races and thereby beating the new strong adversary Porsche.


Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by Ecclesley.
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Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #49

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Lesney 52 Maserati CLT yellow version:





Maserati was a family name. In fact there were seven Maserati brothers, six of whom were fascinated by the automobile and who found work with several Italian car manufacturers. Alfieri Maserati eventually opened a workshop in his own name to build engines and was soon joined by two brothers. However it was 12 years later that the first true Maserati car came out.

The 4CLT was a development of the 4CL which had been strong opposition for the Alfa Romeo 158 and the ERA in the pre-war voiturette classes. The CL was upgraded with tubular chassis and two stage supercharging becoming the CLT by 1948. The development continued at a steady pace each year and into the new formula one era.
It was a good car for privateers and Maserati supported customers quite well. Many of the great names drove Maserati 4CLTs at some point in their careers, names like Alberto Ascari, Reg’ Parnell, Luigi Villoresi, Louis Chiron, Baron de Graffenried and Juan Manuel Fangio.


 


Fangio's car:
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Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #50

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Matchbox no. 56, London Trolley Bus, introduced 1959, 67 mm, scale 1/137.




From Wikipedia:

Trolleybuses served the London Passenger Transport Area from 1931 until 1962. For much of its existence, the London system was the largest in the world. It peaked at 68 routes, with a maximum fleet of 1,811 trolleybuses.

The first 60 trolleybuses were operated by London United Tramways (LUT), from Fulwell bus garage in south-west London. They were nicknamed "Diddlers" and first ran on 16 May 1931.

In 1933 LUT was absorbed into the London Passenger Transport Board (LPTB) along with other tram operators. The LPTB decided to replace all trams with trolleybuses. This started in October 1935 with two more former LUT routes, and continued in stages until June 1940, when it was suspended because of World War II. By then nearly all the trams north of the River Thames had been replaced, but there were still 1,100 trams in use in South London. In 1946 it was decided that the remaining trams would be replaced by diesel buses. Trolleybuses were bigger than diesel buses (70 seats compared to 56), and so more diesel buses would be required. It was thought, however, that there would be fewer uncollected fares on the smaller vehicles.

In 1948 a new batch of 77 trolleybuses replaced the Diddlers and trolleybuses that had been destroyed by enemy action. A further 50 new trolleybuses were delivered in 1952 to replace the oldest vehicles, which were then 16 years old.

In 1954, it was announced that all trolleybuses were to be replaced with the exception of the post-war vehicles, which would be retained until about 1970 and run over the original LUT routes. Conversion began in 1959, using AEC Regent III RT buses for the first three stages and new AEC Routemasters for the remainder.

A consortium of Spanish operators bought the post-war vehicles. The former LUT routes were the last to be converted to diesel buses, on 8 May 1962.

The trolleybuses were designed and built specifically to be worthy tram replacements. Like the trams, they were large high-capacity double deckers, with rapid acceleration. They had three axles (necessary as 30 feet long), and were much quieter in operation than contemporary trams or diesel buses. Trolleybuses were built on AEC, Leyland and British United Traction chassis.

Apart from the Diddlers and a few experimental vehicles, most London trolleybuses were near-identical. There was an exception: in 1941 and 1943 London Transport acquired 43 trolleybuses that had been ordered for South Africa but could not be shipped there because of the war. These vehicles were allocated to Ilford depot.

One experimental vehicle was proposed to be the forerunner of a fleet that would use the Kingsway tramway subway, but the change of policy after the war meant that this was never carried out.

Some trolleybuses are now preserved in the United Kingdom by the East Anglia Transport Museum, the London Transport Museum, the London Bus Museum and The Trolleybus Museum at Sandtoft. One of the 1948 vehicles has also been repatriated from Spain.

Kind regards, Jan
Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by janwerner.
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Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #51

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Matchbox Y5 Bentley 4,5 ltr Blower





Walter Owen Bentley came from a well to do family but died a somewhat poor man.





W.O. founded Bentley Motors Ltd. in 1919, building the first 3 ltr. engined prototypes. The 3 ltr. Bentley cars became available to the public in 1921 and a year later production really started making numbers. By that time Bentley Motor Ltd was already in dire financial trouble, in fact they were short of funds from day one. W.O. was a brilliant designer/technician, but had no clue of how to deal with money and the people surrounding him were no better.


Bentley 3 ltr.



But they soldiered on, believing that their luck would change some day. In 1923 two of Bentley's customers came with the idea to enter a 3 ltr. model in the (first) Le Mans 24h. race. W.O. disapproved, saying the car would not last the distance, and he feared a lot of negative publicity. But much to his surprise the car finished the race in 4th place. So next year (1924) the same privateer racing drivers participated at Le Mans again, this time with some works support and they won.



This attracted a great number of customers many of whom were wealthy, adventurous young men, the name: Bentley Boys was born. The future was looking brighter.


Meanwhile Bentley developed two new models the 6,5 ltr. (Speed Six) and the (unblown) 4,5 ltr. to be the replacement of the ageing 3 ltr. model.


The 6 ltr. model.



However 1925 and 1926 brought disastrous bad results at Le Mans, and Bentley's purse was empty, technically the company was bankrupt. There were mortgages and loans everywhere and they could not even afford a roll of biscuits.


One of the wealthy Bentley Boys, Wolf Barnato, heir to South African gold and diamond mines, took over the company, devaluated the shares from 1 pound to 1 shilling (remaining value: 5%), and paid back the existing loans and mortgages. W.O. was removed from the management board but was tied to a contract which meant that he and his name would stay with the company for as long as he lived.


Under Barnato's management money was spent like water, thanks to his playboy nature. Racing became more important than building and selling cars and although Bentley won Le Mans in 1927/28/29 and 30, the financial troubles never went away. Came the Wall Street crash of 1929 and the writing was on the wall. The new 8 ltr. Bentley introduced in 1929 did hardly sell and the curtain fell in 1931, Bentley was on the rocks.


Well what about the 4,5 ltr. Blower?. In fact W.O did not want to have anything to do with that car. He said: "I do not corrupt my own design by putting a supercharger on it". The cars were built by Sir Henry (Tim) Birkin, one of the other Bentley Boys, and the (Bentley) chassis were supplied by Barnato.


The 4,5 ltr. Blower was a technical and financial disaster, it bankrupted Henry Birkin and it accelerated the downfall of Bentley. Not a single race was won by the Blower, most of the time the car dropped out with a "blown" engine.


In 1931 Bentley was bought by Rolls Royce in a most peculiar court case and from that moment on W.O. was a (very unhappy) employee of R.R. Ltd. He left for Lagonda in 1935.


Nowadays the Blower, of which 50 originals were made, is one of the most sought after Bentley cars, fetching ultra high prices at auction. The reason for that lies in the fact that through the years technology of supercharging improved and specialised companies succeeded in making the Blower Bentleys a bomb proof sportscar.


The real Blower:


Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by Ecclesley.
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Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #52

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Holden VE SS ute (Or if you are in America El Camino)











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Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #53

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Here's the trolley bus from the Sandtoft museum.



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Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #54

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I soooo like this topic!

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #55

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Bugatti Type 35 and 51



















Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by blackstone.
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Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #56

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Looks like they have re-arranged the exhibits since I was there in May 2010



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Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #57

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MG TC (Blue)



























Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #58

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Leyland truck











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Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #59

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Matchbox Y15 Rolls Royce Silver Ghost:






Although 7874 Silver Ghosts were made, there is only one Silver Ghost. And that is the name of the 1907 car with reg # AX201 and chassis #60551. All other 7873 Silver Ghosts are 40/50 HP models, who were given that name in retrospect. Arguably the most famous and probably the most expensive car in the world today. It earned Rolls Royce the accolade "The best car in the world" by the motoring press, because it was by far the best in reliability, comfort, silence, hillclimbs, long distance running and performance.


With those achievements under its belt the car was sold to the Hanbury family who used it very frequently for long distance trips from England to Switzerland and Italy.


In 1948 Rolls Royce bought the car back, and after restoration it was displayed as the company's flagship and used for special events. In 2005 the insured value was 35 million pounds, but I guess it is much higher now; 100 Million perhaps?


With the sale of Rolls Royce/Bentley to the Germans, a most deplorable chapter in the history of the most famous car opened up.


First of all I feel that the sale should never have taken place. You do not sell the Humber Bridge, Big Ben or the crown jewels to the Germans and the same goes for Rolls Royce/Bentley. But we have to thank EU law making for the creation of such lurid decisions. Another piece of national history trampled underfoot.


Worst of all was the split up of both marques. First VW, being the highest bidder,  thought they had won both brands, but the RR parent company (aerospace) preferred BMW and therefore did not surrender the Rolls Royce trademark to VW. A compromise was struck by all parties involved during a game of golf, VW got Bentley; BMW got Rolls Royce.


Part of the deal was the priceless Silver Ghost and guess, who owns it now?


BMW/Rolls Royce?


No it is owned by VW/Bentley.


The most famous Rolls Royce car is now Bentley property, complete madness!



Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by Ecclesley.

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #60

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1960 Pontiac Convertible.