Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions
(1 viewing) (1) Guest
Whether you're into Lesney Regular Wheels, Superfast, the Tyco Era or modern Mattel Matchbox, here's the place to chat about all things MB!

TOPIC: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #31

Platinum Boarder
Well, Gerrtit, it seems you have fortunately recovered quite a bit. Thanks for the interesting posts above!
I found some image material of the Matchbox Major Pack M-9, the impressive 'Cooper-Jarrett Inc.' Inter-State Double Freighter, with Hendrickson-Relay Tractor. As they used GMC COE Diesel Tractors previously, there is also a model-real-world link with the Dinky Supertoys Tractor-Trailer McLean. Kind regards, Jan 







Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by janwerner.
The following user(s) said Thank You: RoutemasterNL, CollectorandrestorerMark

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #32

Platinum Boarder
janwerner wrote:
Well, Gerrit, it seems you have fortunately recovered quite a bit. Thanks for the interesting posts above!
 Kind regards, Jan 
 














janwerner wrote:
Thanks Jan your post are equally interesting, as usual.
janwerner wrote:
Not just a car but also a story.
  
janwerner wrote:
Yes I am okay (again), for as long as it takes?  I am now trying to recover from the Dutch elections...........................






Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by Ecclesley.

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #33

Platinum Boarder
https://www.planetdiecast.com/hwdphotos/upload_tinymce/thumbnails/image_1489681426.jpeg







https://www.planetdiecast.com/hwdphotos/upload_tinymce/thumbnails/image_1489681447.jpeg
Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by michael77.

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #34

Platinum Boarder
Micheal, you seem to be missing the IMG link in your picture posts so here are the images. Matchbox #9 Ford RS2000


https://www.planetdiecast.com/hwdphotos/upload_tinymce/thumbnails/1_1489682989.jpeg


And the real world car, Sans Livery.


https://www.planetdiecast.com/hwdphotos/upload_tinymce/thumbnails/2_1489683047.jpeg

They don't seem to want to post as pictures. Nothing wrong with the file name as I changed them to 1 and 2 when I saved them from the links. Hmmmm!?
Edit by nobleco
Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by Nobleco.

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #35

Platinum Boarder
Matchbox #19D Lotus Racing Car:





The Lotus 25 was a racing car designed by Colin Chapman for the 1962 Formula One season. It was a revolutionary design, the first fully stressed monocoque chassis to appear in F1. In the hands of Jim Clark it took 14 World Championship Grand Prix wins and propelled him to his 1963 World Championship title.


Thumbs up from Jim Clark:





The car gave Clark his first World Championship Grand Prix victory, at Spa in 1962. He took another win in Britain and again in the USA, which put him in contention for the title, but while leading the final race in South Africa a much publicised engine seizure cost him the title to Graham Hill.





Clark gained his revenge the following year, taking his first World Championship in the 25, by winning 7 races, Belgium, France, Holland, Britain, Italy, South Africa, and Mexico. Lotus also won its first constructors' championship. Following the United States GP, a 25 was taken to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for evaluation, where they also tested Lucas electronic ignition for Ford. The results were encouraging enough for Colin Chapman to mount his ultimately successful challenge on the Indianapolis 500.

Jim Clark and Dan Gurney at the Brickyard



The 25 was again used during the 1964 season, winning a further three races in Clark's hands. At the final race in Mexico, just as in 1962, the Climax engine developed an oil leak and with literally a lap to run Clark coasted to a halt in sight of world championship victory, this time conceding to John Surtees. Despite the introduction of the Lotus 33 in 1964, the 25 was still used until well into the 1965 season, Clark taking the car's final win at the 1965 French Grand Prix.
The following user(s) said Thank You: RoutemasterNL

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #36

Platinum Boarder
Matchbox #53B BRM racer:





 


Until the 1960's when BRM (British Racing Motors) started to make a much more successful impression in the world of F1, I always thought that BRM stood for British Racing Misery, as many of their racers were a complete failure.

Not this BRM P261, nicely re-produced by Lesney; that was a front runner and arguably their most successful racing car.
Here Graham Hill at the 1964 Monaco GP:





The P261 began as a P61, a chassis built to compete with the successful Lotus 25 Monocoque car. However early handling problems required an update to the design to stiffen the chassis hence the MK2 version became known as the P261. BRM designer Tony Rudd created a monocoque chassis by covering a steel tubular sections in an aluminum skin. The 1.5 litre engine was revised to produce around 200 bhp. Early race results showed the car had great promise, lapping 1 second quicker in testing than the older space frame P57 after the handling problems were rectified. With a total of 18 Race wins in all competitions with 6 of them in Grand Prix, the P261 was most successful car built by BRM.

Here Ritchie Ginther driving the P261:


Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #37

Platinum Boarder
Matchbox # 65A Jaguar MKI





I am a Rolls Royce and Bentley fan, but a classic Jaguar always wins my heart.
This particular model, which I wish to call the Jaguar MKI, is one of those nifty Matchbox items. To me the shape is somewhat better balanced than its successor, the 65B, a 3,8 ltr. Mark II Jaguar. I personally like the thicker window frames, which gives it a much more classic style look.





The Jaguar Mark 1 was produced between 1955 and 1959. Referred to in contemporary company documentation as the Jaguar 2.4 Litre and Jaguar 3.4 Litre. The designation "Mark I" was included retrospectively upon its replacement by the Mark II in October 1959. The 2.4 Litre was the company's first small saloon since the demise of its 1½ and 2½ Litre cars in 1949, and was an immediate success, easily outselling the larger Jaguar saloons.





The 2.4 Litre saloon was announced on 28 September 1955. The 3.4 Litre saloon announced 17 months later in the USA on 26 February 1957, was designed for the American market and was not at first freely available in the UK.

Mark I 3.4 Litre saloons competed successfully in many rallies, touring car and saloon car races. Notable drivers included Stirling Moss, Mike Hawthorn, Tommy Sopwith, and Roy Salvadori.


The following user(s) said Thank You: RoutemasterNL, CollectorandrestorerMark

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #38

Platinum Boarder
65B:



Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by janwerner.

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #39

Platinum Boarder
Jim and Michael, the problem with the photos is the file-extensions... jpEg, instead of jpg.














Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #40

Platinum Boarder
Model T Ford


Has anyone on here tried to drive one of these ? I did once and don't wish to again.











Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #41

Platinum Boarder
"Bullnose" Morris Cowley Doctors Coupe.











Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #42

Platinum Boarder
A couple of oldies but goldies, childhood toys I played with a lot. The Diamond (1956) is in fact my earliest surviving Matchbox toy. The Rotinoff (1959) replaced it with the same number 15. It survived with its box. Both were prime movers, used for heavy duty work. The Rotinoff was really huge. Kind regards, Jan








Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #43

Platinum Boarder
Guy Warrior car transporter M8B, K8B:





Guy Motors was a Wolverhampton-based vehicle manufacturer that produced cars, lorries, buses and trolleybuses. The company was founded by Sydney S. Guy (1885-1971) who was born in Kings Heath, Birmingham. Guy Motors operated out of its Fallings Park factory from 1914 to 1982, playing an important role in the development of the British motor industry.

Although new designs such as the Warrior Mark II were being produced and despite the fact that their lorry division was performing well by 1960, Guy faced seemingly insurmountable financial problems. The failure of the Wulfrunian was a commercial disaster.
By 1961, Guy had no choice but to enter receivership. Sir William Lyons, managing director of Jaguar, acquired the company for £800,000, transferring its assets to a new company, Guy Motors (Europe) Limited, which left all the liabilities with the now defunct Guy Motors Limited, the name eventually reverting to "Guy Motors Ltd" in 1966. Jaguar immediately set about rationalisation.





 





 


In 1966, Jaguar had merged with the British Motor Corporation to form British Motor Holdings. This company had then merged with Leyland in 1968 to form the British Leyland Motor Corporation. Leyland ceased the production of Guy-badged buses in 1972, although Leyland-badged versions of the Guy Victory were produced at Wolverhampton and Leyland until 1986.

Guy Motors was able to postpone closure, in part due to the success of its Big J range, because it was one of the few companies owned by British Leyland operating at a profit. Nevertheless, in 1981, Leyland decided to close the Fallings Park plant as part of a rationalisation drive and in August 1982, the doors were shut at the cost of 740 jobs. On 5 October, the factory was stripped clean and the contents auctioned. The closure of Guy Motors had a devastating impact on the factory's neighbouring areas, including Heath Town and Low Hill, where many of the company's workers lived, contributing to a rise in the already high unemployment in these areas.


Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #44

Platinum Boarder
Matchbox SF #39 Rolls Royce Silver Shadow II





Different from the 24c Silver Shadow I model, shown before, this car has the thicker US bumpers. I had the pleasure of owning and driving such a car for 4 years.


Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #45

Platinum Boarder
Teebodk wrote:
Jim and Michael, the problem with the photos is the file-extensions... jpEg, instead of jpg.














 


Yet, when listing the file formates you can use they say JPEG files too.