Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions
(1 viewing) (1) Guest
Whether you're into Lesney Regular Wheels, Superfast, the Tyco Era or modern Mattel Matchbox, here's the place to chat about all things MB!

TOPIC: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #16

Senior Boarder



Glad to get my hands on the Superfast green version of the popular 75 Ferrari Berlinetta. A bit faded on one side and a couple of roof scrapes on this one, but still very displayable!

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #17

Senior Boarder




Another real-life beauty...it even has the spoked hubs the original Matchbox issues had!
Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by CKlaus.

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #18

Platinum Boarder
'Borrani' wire wheels on the full size one !

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #19

Platinum Boarder
Bedford Tow Truck



















The following user(s) said Thank You: karls

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #20

Platinum Boarder



B.P. Autotanker, issued in 1962, was the second issue of Major Pack no. 1 of the 'Matchbox Series'. It succeeded the MP no. 1 Caterpillar Earth Remover of 1960
Both the accurate model and of course it's real world prototype had a very futuristic looks, for that period, but even today it doesn't look old-fashioned either.
However, even in 1962 the design was over four years old, as it was presented on the Earls Court Motor Show in 1958 already. The experiment was a Leyland Dromedary with the bodywork of the familiar tanker builders Thompson Brothers. The prototype used an adapted Leyland Atlantean bus chassis.
Access to the cab, passing through a tiny front door entrance, doesn't seem to have been very practical, but no doubt it was in favour of the smooth body design.
You'll find more detailed information and illustrations of this model and its 1:1 example in: Model Collector Vol. 3 no. 6 (Dec 1989 - Jan 1990), page 19; Arthur Ingram, Truck Nostalgia, Poole : Blandford Press, 1985 page 105.
Kind regards, Jan 






Last Edit: 3 years, 11 months ago by janwerner.
The following user(s) said Thank You: RoutemasterNL

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #21

Platinum Boarder
Matchbox # 41B Jaguar D type:



The real deal:



Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #22

Platinum Boarder
Bedford car transporter:






The real one:


Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #23

Platinum Boarder
Matchbox #53 Aston Martin DB 2/4





And the live version:



The following user(s) said Thank You: karls

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #24

Platinum Boarder
Lesney Aston Martin DBR







The real one:


Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #25

Platinum Boarder
Lesney Ferrari Sharknose:






The real one:


Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #26

Platinum Boarder
Matchbox #41C Ford GT







For real:


Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #27

Platinum Boarder
Maserati 4CLT racer:






In them days:


Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #28

Platinum Boarder
Matchbox SF #45 Ford 3 ltr. Group 6





 


The Ford F3L Group 6 has a special place in my heart, it always reminds me of two things, the sheer beauty of the car and the tragedy it carried with it.


The story goes as follows:

The great aerodynamic shape of this Len Bailey designed Ford F3L P68, belies its fate. The car introduced in 1968 was meant to be the successor to the ageing Ford GT40, also complying with the new 3 liter group 6 prototype formula.
The car was managed by Alan Mann Racing team of Byfleet, a team of high repute, always turning out immaculate red and gold cars.





But it never was a success of any kind, moreover the Ford GT 40, it was supposed to eclipse, went on to win the Le Mans 24h. in both 1968 and 1969 under the John Wyer Gulf Team banner.

The fact that the F3L would never be a great success in long distance racing was mainly due to the fact that this car was propelled by the Ford Cosworth 3 ltr. DFV V8. This engine, the brainchild of Keith Duckworth was the prime F1 engine for many years, collecting 12 F1 world championships and winning 176 GP's, but it was no endurance engine in the days of the Ford F3L, by a landslide.
It took another 8 years of development before a DFV would be successful at long distant racing and Le Mans.
The DFV made its debut at the Zandvoort GP F1 of 1967, the late Jim Clark winning in the Lotus 49 first time out. I was there at Zandvoort to see it happen. Scotsman Jim Clark was and is still my #1 F1 driver.

The day is the 7th April of 1968, a day that will stick in my mind for ever and a month; the Ford F3L makes its debut at the Brands Hatch BOAC 500 km race.

Months before that race, Colin Chapman of Team Lotus was approached by Ford to prepare and surrender two Ford DFV engines to Alan Mann Racing. Lotus being the only team to have availability of this engine. That changed in 1969 when more F1 teams got the DFV as well.
Also Ford wanted both Team Lotus top drivers Jim Clark and Graham Hill to debut the Ford F3L at Brands Hatch on the 7th of April to get maximum exposure of the new car.
Chapman was not amused, to say the least, to release the engines, knowing how precious they were, also knowing their limitations in endurance racing. But Ford forced Chapman to follow their demands.
As a kind of personal satisfaction Colin Chapman was ever so happy to be able to withdraw both Jimmy and Graham from the F3L debut, because of a clash in sponsorship interests, Team Lotus was running on Firestone tires, Alan Mann was contracted to Good Year. The debut was performed by Mike Spence and Bruce McLaren, it was a non finisher.

Instead Colin Chapman transferred both Clark and Hill to a F2 race at Hockenheim. A race, run in dreadful conditions, of very little importance.
I was out in the street with my friends on Sunday 7th April 1968 when my mother called me to come inside the house.
She told me she just heard on the wireless that Jim Clark had died in a race in Germany. The world of motorsport was in shock.
I was sick instantly, did not have dinner that evening and sat in my room for hours staring at the wall in disgust.

The irony of fate connected to this beautiful car.

30 years later I visited the Jim Clark room at Duns in Scotland, as well as his grave to pay my respects.
My signature is in the guest book, below that of Ayrton Senna, who flew out of Brasil to pay his respects to a man the admired.



The following user(s) said Thank You: karls, RoutemasterNL, CollectorandrestorerMark

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #29

Platinum Boarder
Nice to have that connection to Ayrton Senna however tenuous.


If my memory is correct the red car was restored by Autocraft ( The Cobra people ) and Rod Leach had it road registered ?

Re: Matchbox vs. Real Life Versions 3 years, 11 months ago #30

Platinum Boarder
Dinkydi wrote:
Nice to have that connection to Ayrton Senna
Dinkydi wrote:
however tenuous.


If my memory is correct the red car was restored by Autocraft ( The Cobra people ) and Rod Leach had it road registered ?
 


 


The last time I saw the F3L in the flesh was at the Goodwood Historic races. There were two and both were part of David Piper's racing team.





I know Rod Leach but I don't know if a car like this was ever made road legal.